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Downstate at 150: A Celebration of Achievement FOLIO

A collection of biographies about notable alumni and faculty who have been at Downstate.

Achievement is here. Now available at the Campus Bookstore. Own a piece of SUNY Downstate history.

Herbert L. Abrams, MD 1946

Herbert L. Abrams, MD 1946

The fourth dimension: Activism

by Stanley Baum, MD

Radiologist, former chairman at Harvard Medical School, 1967–1985. Since then professor at Stanford University and member of the University Center for International Security and Arms Control. Authored eight books on cardiovascular imaging, health policy and presidential disability and more than 200 articles on cardiovascular disease, technology assessment, the effects of weapons of mass destruction, and the health of national leaders. Member of the IOM of the National Academy of Sciences.

Alfred Adler, MD

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Alfred Adler, MD

1870-1937

Scientist of the ego

by The Editors

One of the greatest influences in modern psychiatry, joined the faculty at LICM in 1934. Founded his School of Individual Psychotherapy. Stimulated prominent psychiatric theorists and had an enormous effect on the disciplines of counseling and psychotherapy. Published over 300 books and articles and lectured widely in America and Europe.

Michael A. Apicella, MD 1963

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Michael A. Apicella, MD 1963

Elucidated the pathogenetic mechanisms of human infectious agents

Long interest in infectious disease and the mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis of strict human pathogens. An internist, Apicella is an international leader in basic microbiological research. Trained almost 50 graduate students and post-doctoral fellows many of whom have gone on to distinguished careers.

Stanley M. Aronson, MD

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Stanley M. Aronson, MD

Eminent educator, neuropathologist; popular lecturer

by Daniel P. Perl, MD 1967

Director of Neuropathology at Downstate beginning in 1954. Trained a large number of fellows most of whom went on to leadership positions in neuropathology. An erudite and effective lecturer popular with students. Went to Brown University in 1970 as chair of Pathology and as founding dean for their new medical school.

Robert Austrian, MD

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Robert Austrian, MD

1916-2007

The pneumococcus - Brooklyn connection

by Margaret Hammerschlag, MD

Clinician, epidemiologist and microbiologist, he developed a pneumococcal vaccine that saves the lives of hundreds of thousands. At the time of introduction of penicillin and other antibiotics the assumption of most was that infectious disease was no longer life threatening. Austrian demonstrated through meticulous studies that pneumococcal pneumonia was still a killer, especially in the elderly. Member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences.

Oswald T. Avery, MD

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Oswald T. Avery, MD

1877-1955

The nature and cause of disease

by Michael Augenbraun, MD

Hoagland Laboratory was the first privately endowed bacteriologic research laboratory in America. Appointed associate director in 1907, performed systematic work on many strains of bacteria, applying immunologic and chemical methods, to understand the biologic activities of pathogenic bacteria through their chemical composition. Clinical study of tuberculosis resulted in appointment to Rockefeller Institute Hospital in 1913, where he did his Pneumococcus work, the immunology of bacterial infections, and analysis of DNA, until retirement in 1948.

Frank L. Babbott, Jr. MD

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Frank L. Babbott, Jr. MD, 1972H

1891-1970

Envisioned Downstate on Clarkson Avenue

by The Editors

Joined the staff as a pediatrician. Subsequently served as president of LICM for 10 years and then chaired the Board of Trustees. Led the separation of the College from LICH and the purchase of the three blocks opposite KCH for the medical school. Had the vision to create a major medical center for Brooklyn.

Alfred C. Beck, MD

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Alfred C. Beck, MD

1885-1979

Great obstetrical innovator

by Vincent Tricomi, MD 1950

Developed numerous obstetrical procedures and techniques that became associated with the Beck name. Loved teaching and was dedicated to patient care. Initiated major advances. Popularized local anesthesia in obstetrics. His textbook, Obstetrical Practice, had seven editions and several additional printings.

Henri Begleiter, PhD

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Henri Begleiter, PhD

1935-2006

Scientist, mentor and life enthusiast

by Bernice Porjesz, PhD

Established the Neurodynamics Laboratory at Downstate. Begleiter, with studies in both animals and humans, made significant contributions to the neuroscience and genetics of alcoholism and identified the antecedent abnormalities present prior to exposure to alcohol that were predisposing factors and the progressive effects of alcoholism. Initiated the NIH long-term well-funded Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism.

Lowell E. Bellin, MD 1951, MPH

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Lowell E. Bellin, MD 1951, MPH

1928-1997

Charismatic leader and devoted public servant

by Pascal J. Imperato, MD 1962, MPH & TM

Was New York City Commissioner of Health in the 1970s and launched several important initiatives, including the first bans on smoking in public places, the mandatory use of window guards to safeguard children, and the prevention of burning high sulphur fuels in the city. Trained large numbers of professionals who later assumed leadership positions in public health and health care administration across the country.

Angela A. Bennett, MD 1953

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Angela A. Bennett, MD 1953

Labored to improve the lives of children and everyone else

by Margaret Golden, MD

Director of pediatric undergraduate medical education for 30 years and led the program through those years of major changes in patient care as new diseases emerged and pediatrics expanded to include adolescence and all of its special problems. Students were always her priority.

Joseph R. Bertino, MD 1954

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Joseph R. Bertino, MD 1954

Developed antifolate chemotherapeutic drugs for treating cancer

by The Editors

Leading cancer researcher, is chairman of Molecular Pharmacology and Therapeutics at Memorial. Known for his research into folate metabolism and the development of antifolate chemotherapeutic agents that were widely adopted for treating cancers. Was at Yale in Medicine and Pharmacology for 25 years. Author or co-author of 300 scientific publications and 130 reviews and editorials.

Randall Bloomfield, MD 1953

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Randall Bloomfield, MD 1953

Advocate and activist guide for city youths

by Marvin Kochman, MD 1953

Long record of doing good highlighted by his many successful initiatives, coupled with his public and personal stature. When State officials proposed removing Downstate’s funding he led efforts to cancel the threat. He has usually been thrust into the leadership of many professional, political and community organizations which has helped him to voice his concerns about the need for opportunities for disadvantaged youngsters. He has actively encouraged inner-city youth to consider careers in medicine.

Alfred Jay Bollet, MD

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Alfred Jay Bollet, MD

Peripatetic scholar with wit and a prodigious memory

by Donald Gerber, MD, 1997H

Rheumatologist with record of consequential research and successive successful academic chairmanships crowned with his appointment as chairman of Medicine at Downstate in 1974. Member of the ABIM, AAMC, NBME, several advisory committees for the NIH, and visiting professorships in several medical schools in this period. In 1979, clinical professor of Medicine at Yale. Has numerous publications and continues to write and lecture about epidemic diseases and Civil War medicine.

John G. Boyce, MD, 1993H, MS

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John G. Boyce, MD, MS, 1993H

Epidemiology of gynecological malignancies

by Alexander Sedlis, MD

This talented physician was an outstanding gynecologic oncologist with expertise in the epidemiology of malignancies of the genital tract. Was chairman of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Downstate and was promoted to Distinguished Service Professor. Awarded "One of the Best Doctors in NYC" several times.

JoAnn Bradley, EdD, 2002H

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JoAnn Bradley, EdD, 2002H

Remarkable and effective administrator, organizer and fund raiser

by Ellen Watson

Held senior academic and administrative positions here and raised millions of dollars for Downstate as senior vice president for institutional advancement and philanthropy. Graduated from Downstate’s College of Health Related Professions, and was subsequently dean. Expanded the programs to provide enhanced career opportunities attracting exceptional ethnic and racial diversity. Planned the institute for urban health which Arthur Ashe founded. Continues to contribute leadership to many of our programs.

Albert S. Braverman, MD

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Albert S. Braverman, MD

Battles against compromises in patient care; demands high-quality medical care

by Peter Gillette, MD

Director of hematology-oncology division. Vast energies devoted to clinical care and training and teaching fellows, residents and students. Defies institutional compromises. Has trained over 200 fellows and 700 residents. For more than 30 years maintained the multidiscipline breast cancer clinic. Developed a pre-operative neo-adjuvant chemotherapy service for advanced breast cancer. Continues to publish literary criticism.

Chandler McCuskey Brooks, PhD

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Chandler McCuskey Brooks, PhD, 1972H

1905-1989

The scientist and the man

by Kiyomi Koizumi, MD, PhD

Chairman of Physiology for 25 years, he created world-class research laboratories and recruited other department chairs for Downstate. His many stellar contributions include the founding of the Graduate School. Was an accomplished investigator, and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. Unstinting in his aid to colleagues and his help to international scientists earned him honors and medals from many countries.

Audrey K. Brown, MD

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Audrey K. Brown, MD

1923-2001

A founder of neonatology

by Donald Gerber, MD, 1997H

Professor of Pediatrics and vice-chair of the department at Downstate, she made many contributions to neonatology. Her work on neonatal jaundice and kernicterus is still widely cited. Continued her role as a woman exemplar in medicine for five decades. Was an academician, a clinician, and a researcher and published over a hundred scientific papers.

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Hugh J. Carroll, MD, 1990H

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Hugh J. Carroll, MD, 1990H

Salt and water scholar; brilliant teacher

1925-2010
by Man Oh, MD, 2004H

Distinguished teaching professor of Medicine, epitomizes Downstate’s mission of education, research, and patient care. Is a revered teacher who has received numerous awards, especially from students. Has studied, taught about and headed the division concerned with hypertension, electrolytes, and acid-base metabolism for many years. For 15 years was an attending physician for the NYC Marathon and worked the acute-care tent at the finish line.

Duncan W. Clark, MD 1936

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Duncan W. Clark, MD 1936

1910-2007

Preventive medicine advocate

by Pascal J. Imperato, MD 1962, MPH & TM

Chair emeritus of Preventive Medicine and dean emeritus of the College of Medicine. Prominent educator, scientist, public health leader and spokesman. Had a critical role in merger of the LICM and SUNY. Strong advocate of water fluoridation, was instrumental in gaining public acceptance. Responsible for establishing the Eta Chapter of Alpha Omega Alpha at Downstate. Received numerous awards and honors.

William A. Console, MD 1937

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William A. Console, MD 1937

1912-1975

Psychoanalyst and a caring, resolute teacher

by Alan Eisnitz, MD 1949

Wartime experience convinced him of the importance of emotional factors in all illness and in all of life as well. A talented physician and an enthusiastic teacher who was always available to students, residents, and faculty. Studied the effectiveness of free or very low-fee psychoanalytic treatment and also treatment outcomes of psychotherapy.

James E. Cottrell, MD, 2003H

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James E. Cottrell, MD, 2003H

Dedicated to relieving pain and bringing comfort

by John Hartung, PhD

Whether anesthetizing patients, investigating anesthetic techniques, telling the public how to get better service from their medical providers, leading the world’s largest and most influential anesthesiology organization, or cooking and packing meals at God’s Love We Deliver, he has dedicated his life to relieving pain and bringing comfort. He has published extensively and lectured especially on neurosurgical anesthesiology.

Roger Cracco, MD, 1999H

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Roger Cracco, MD, 1999H

Stimulating faculty and evoked potentials

by George A. Vas, MD, 2010H

Distinguished professor of Neurology, has authored over 300 publications, mostly about evoked potentials and transcranial magnetic stimulation. Chairman since 1980, now vice-dean of the College of Medicine and director of the Furchgott Center for Neural and Behavioral Science at Downstate. Expanded Neurology from seven to thirty full-time faculty.

John P. Craig, MD, MPH, 1996H

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John P. Craig, MD, MPH, 1996H

A physician-scientist, ardent student, gifted educator

by Haseeb A. Siddiqi, PhD, 2006H

Distinguished Professor of Microbiology and Immunology. Attained international renown for studying the biologic properties of cholera enterotoxin, stimulating widespread research that has elucidated its structure and mechanism of action. Has a profound understanding of the natural history and pathogenesis of infectious diseases and the multifactorial determinants of susceptibility and/or resistance to infection. Has consistently maintained the academic essentials: research, productive scholarship, service, teaching, stimulated interest, and a passion for integrity.

Eva B. Cramer, PhD, 1999H

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Eva B. Cramer, PhD, 1999H

Develops and promotes the Brooklyn biotechnology centers

by George Ojakian, PhD

As vice-president for Scientific Affairs, established the two Biotechnology Centers for technology companies and medical innovators and provides research opportunities for translational research programs: the Advanced Biotechnology Incubator adjacent to the Downstate campus and the newly developed Brooklyn Army Terminal provide space for development and manufacturing.

Paul F. Cranefield, PhD, MD

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Paul F. Cranefield, PhD, MD

1925-2003

Rhythms of the heart, science and theater

by Andrew L. Wit, PhD

Taught Physiology at Downstate in the 1950s where with Brian Hoffman established the new discipline of cellular cardiac electrophysiology, revolutionizing the study of cardiac arrhythmias. Spent most of his scientific career at Rockefeller University, in further studies of arrhythmia electrophysiology, after earning an MD. Was editor of the Journal of General Physiology for 30 years, and an eminent scientific historian, and directed several off-Broadway theatre companies.

Jean A. Curran, MD, 1973H

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Jean A. Curran, MD, 1973H

1893-1977

SUNY and LICM, first and last Dean

by Pascal J. Imperato, MD 1962, MPH

Dean, LICM 1937 and then president in 1942. Numerous initiatives for improving the school and its affiliates. Raised admission standards and installed full-time department heads. Oversaw the SUNY merger and the relocation to Clarkson Avenue. Urged students to seek stronger internships. Also, active locally and nationally in improving quality of internships and residencies.

Raymond V. Damadian, MD, 1999H

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Raymond V. Damadian, MD, 1999H

Inventor of magnetic resonance imaging

by Paul Dreizen, MD, 2001H

First conceived of applying nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool for scanning to distinguish diseased from healthy cells, after having demonstrated that cancers produced abnormal MR signals, when he was professor of Medicine at Downstate. Inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame and awarded the National Medal of Technology by President Reagan.

Richard L. Day, MD

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Richard L. Day, MD

1905-1989

Caring physician and clinical investigation

by Henry A. Schaeffer, MD

The father of modern perinatology. Did basic work in thermoregulation and described familial dysautonomia, correctly postulated that bilirubin caused kernicterus, and using the randomized trial, identified the role of oxygen in causing retrolental fibroplasias. As the first full-time salaried chairman of Pediatrics at Downstate, significantly enlarged the pediatric faculty and strengthened the training of medical students and residents.

Gerald W. Deas, MS, MPH, MD 1962

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Gerald W. Deas, MS, MPH, MD 1962

Activist, author, poet, playwright, teacher, clinician

by Clinton Brown, MD

Patient advocate and compassionate public health crusader, traced the anemia in black women and especially those pregnant, to the ingestion of laundry starch that blocked iron absorption. Active in clinical practice and prominent radio and television host who focuses on health care and preventive medicine and has inspired many boys and girls to become doctors.

Clarence Dennis, MD, MA, PhD, 1990H

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Clarence Dennis, MD, MA, PhD, 1990H

1909-2005

Translational scientist, developed extracorporeal oxygenator

by Gerald Shafton, MD and Michael E. Zenilman, MD 1984

Studied cardiopulmonary bypass physiology and developed and implemented, with John Gibbon, the extracorporeal membrane oxygenator. Performed the first open heart operation for a congenital heart defect. His interest in general surgery was far sighted. While chairman of Surgery at Downstate performed successful open-heart surgeries with a pump built here. Was a gifted educator who trained scores of surgeons.

Thomas C. Detwiler, PhD

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Thomas C. Detwiler, PhD

Brought physiology to hematology

by Richard D. Feinman, PhD

Contributed to the understanding of platelet physiology. Changed the way platelet research is done, employing the methods of quantitative biochemistry and cell biology with quantitative studies of platelet receptors, agonist-response coupling mechanisms and secretory mechanisms. Shortened experimental time frame from hours to seconds. Stimulated a fundamental reevaluation of accepted concepts. Was an outstanding and very popular teacher.

Robert L. Dickinson, MD 1882

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Robert L. Dickinson, MD 1882

1861-1950

Art and science of obstetrics

by Vincent Tricomi, MD 1950

Private practice; clinical professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Published more than 100 clinical articles. Introduced major ObGyn clinical advances. During WW I commissioned as a lieutenant general. Postwar devoted himself to the physical and social problems of marital relations contending with Victorian attitudes. Staunch supporter of birth control. Textbooks on conception control, sexual anatomy, and marriage still relevant and readable. Artist and sculptor of ability. His 100 models of the stages of labor and pregnancy are at the NY Academy of Medicine.

William Dock, MD

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William Dock, MD

1898-1990

"Go to the patient, because that's where the diagnosis is."

by Peter Gillette, MD

Brilliant physician and enthusiastic teacher with astounding diagnostic acumen. Volunteered as ambulance driver in France in WWI, cited for bravery. After training, appointed professor of Pathology at Stanford. After a couple of years, moved to Cornell as professor of Pathology and then to Downstate as professor of Medicine and chief of service. Introduced early move from bed to chair, within a day or two following an acute myocardial infarct. Enjoyed teaching.

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Ludwig W. Eichna, MD 1979

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Ludwig W. Eichna, MD 1979

1908-2002

Dedicated teacher, insightful critic; graduated from medical school twice

by Paul Dreizen, MD, 2001H

Chairman of Medicine at Downstate 1960-1974. Recruited talented faculty. Instrumental in creation of the MD/PhD program. “Verities in Chaos” spoke of the need to maintain the basic standards of medical education in chaotic times. After stepping down, entered Downstate College of Medicine as a medical student and chronicled and published his perspectives of the full four-year experience in the NEJM. Concluded that needs were: "patient-first" education, strengthened basic sciences, a problem-solving approach, and the teaching of ethics.

Hugh E. Evans, MD 1958

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Hugh E. Evans, MD 1958

Excelled in research, scholarship, perinatology, and wrote about FDR's hypertentsion

By Donald Gerber, MD, 1997H

Published extensively on infectious diseases following two years at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Subsequently chairman of Pediatrics at Jewish Hospital of Brooklyn and then at University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Published over 130 papers and his best-known books: Perinatal Medicine, co-authored with Leonard Glass, Lung Diseases of Children, and The Hidden Campaign: FDR’s Health in the 1944 Election. Received numerous awards.

Andre A. Fenton, PhD 1998

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Andre A. Fenton, PhD 1998

Memory formation and storage

by Roger Q. Cracco, MD, 1999H

Neuroscientist and biomedical engineer. Research: how neurons store information in memory; how brains selectively activate relevant and suppress irrelevant information; how to record this electrical activity. Hippocampal place cells provide information about location in space. Found that these neurons focus on what the animal needs and ignore what is irrelevant. When injected where spatial memories are localized, Zip erased memory.

Laurence Finberg, MD, 1992H

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Laurence Finberg, MD, 1992H

Quiz Kid : University of Chicago :: Leader in pediatrics

by Leonard Glass, MD 1958

Chairman of Pediatrics, 1982-1994 at Downstate. Expanded medical student and resident training programs. Dean of the College of Medicine, 1988-1991, received numerous honors and awards. Chairman, Pediatrics at Montefiore and professor of Pediatrics at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1963-1982. Publications and Research: calcium, Vitamin D, fluid and electrolyte metabolism. American Board of Pediatrics, President, 1978.

Austin Flint, Sr., MD

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Austin Flint, Sr., MD

1812-1886

Therapy of a disease requires knowledge of its natural history

by Peter Gillette, MD

A founding member of Downstate's faculty in 1860, was professor of Pathology and Practical Medicine. Was the first to insist that the sounds and their pitch heard through the stethoscope are important for diagnosis. His Treatise on the Principles and Practice of Medicine is a medical classic. Emphasized that a systematic study of the natural history of disease was necessary. His view of the doctor-patient relation emphasized "frankness…candor and plainness."

Eli A. Friedman, MD 1953

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Eli A. Friedman, MD 1953

Averted the death sentence of renal failure

by Eli A. Friedman, MD 1957

Established first federally funded dialysis facility, a model for clinical care, education and training, and research programs around the world. Evolution of his career and nephrology coincided with the dramatic technological changes accompanying introduction of hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and kidney transplantation. Recipient of the 2010 Edward Gibbs Award in Nephrology by the New York Academy of Medicine. Gave those with chronic kidney failure a new lease on life.

Stanley Friedman, MD, 2001H

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Stanley Friedman, MD, 2001H

He's the anchor and the glue; no one knows better what actually is taught to students

by James B. Ranck, Jr., PhD

No one knows better than Stanley Friedman what is actually taught at Downstate. As senior associate dean for education has reconciled the disparate components and competing priorities to provide leadership and assure a coherent, comprehensive, and effective program of instruction. Broad knowledge and considerable skill combined with prior research, administrative, and graduate student responsibilities constitute his ideal preparation. Distinguished Teaching Professor of Pharmacology.

Robert F. Furchgott, PhD, 1993H

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Robert F. Furchgott, PhD, 1993H

1916-2009

Wanted to change his license plate to read EDRFNO

by Stanley Friedman, MD, 2001H & Desingarao Jothianandan, PhD

1998 Nobel Prize winning pharmacologist, helped show that nitric oxide (NO) is the signaling molecule in vascular system. Discovered at Downstate that cells lining blood vessels produce a labile substance he called “Endothelium Derived Relaxing Factor” (EDRF) that induces vascular relaxation, later shown to be NO. Founding chairman and distinguished professor emeritus of Pharmacology at Downstate. Member National Academy of Sciences. Extraordinary scientist, teacher, mentor, and friend to many.

Seymour Furman, MD 1955

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Seymour Furman, MD 1955

1931-2006

Transvenous endocardial pacing of the heart

by The Editors

Director emeritus of Pacemaker Center at Montefiore Medical Center. Called “enabler of modern electrophysiologic diagnostic and therapeutic modalities.” The techniques have saved or improved lives of many patients worldwide. With his knowledge of right-heart catheterization and intracardiac electrocardiography, proposed and proved that the heart could be paced endocardially. Refined the techniques of temporary and permanent pacemaker application. Has received numerous honors.

Michael C. Gelfand, MD 1968

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Michael C. Gelfand, MD 1968

Laid foundation for targeted combination drug immunosuppresion

by The Editors

Improved understanding of transplant immunology and immunological aspects of renal disease. Showed that B cells and antibodies were important to primary allograft rejection and laid foundation for immunosuppression strategies. Showed that combination drug therapy produces greater immunologic depression than individual agents. Demonstrated that humoral and cellular immunity work synergistically. Faculty of Georgetown’s School of Medicine since 1974 and for ten years, co-director of Hemodialysis, Hemoperfusion, and Transplantation at Georgetown.

Leonard Glass, MD 1958

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Leonard Glass, MD 1958

Compassion and gusto for improving and teaching about perinatal/neonatal care

by Shiela Laungani, MD

Director of neonatology, developed interdisciplinary project protocols and procedures for Regional Perinatal Center he established at University Hospital and at KCHC to improve perinatal/neonatal outcomes. Initiated early intervention programs and high-risk followup clinics. Strong residency and fellowship training. Legendary Finberg, Kravath, Glass daily car pool prepared for morning rounds.

Marc Goldstein, MD 1952

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Marc Goldstein, MD 1972

Restored fertility in men for the journey to parenthood

Urologic surgeon at Weill Medical College of Cornell. Internationally known for pioneering work in vasectomy reversals and repair of varicoceles and blockages. In 1984 developed microsurgical method of varicocelectomy, most common operation to treat male infertility. Published more than 230 articles, book chapters and books. Many national and international professional societies.

Stanley M. Gordon, MD

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Stanley M. Gordon, MD

Instilled a sense of responsibility and ethics in all who worked with him; educator and erudite academic leader

by Harvinder S. Sandhu, MD

Recruited to run orthopedic surgery service. Found on appointment a daunting service that provided inadequate care and ineffective teaching. Through successful recruitment, hard work, and assertive leadership, created an outstanding program focused on patient care that offered a broad range of services with talented subspecialists. Became first chairman of the Department of Orthopedic Surgery, included Rehabilitation. Trained many who gained regional or national prominence.

Charles R. Green, MD

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Charles R. Green, MD

"My door stands ajar" for all who need help to find their inner strength

by Tak-Shun Choi, MD 1993

Dean of Students for over 27 years and more than five thousand medical students and colleagues. Provided a welcoming refuge. Good listener who dispensed understanding and wise counsel and aided students to deal with their inner and external stresses. Maintained a private practice that included house calls throughout his term as dean.

Mimi Halpern, PhD, 2001H

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Mimi Halpern, PhD, 2001H

Sought the common substrate of emotions and the limbic system

by John Kubie, PhD 1977

Neuroanatomist, studied the vomeronasal system of terrestrial vertebrates that required techniques from physiology, biochemistry, and cell biology to understand the functional significance and contrast it to the main olfactory system. Research on the chemical identification of pheromones, and the relation of the physiological mechanisms of odor detection to reptilian brain structure and to learning and reward. Also active in teaching, administration, and school affairs.

Frank H. Hamilton, MD

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Frank H. Hamilton, MD

1813-1886

Founded the Surgery Departments at what became four medical schools in New York

by Dana K. Andersen, MD

The first professor and chairman of surgery at LICM and subsequent professor of military surgery. Widely respected for his contributions to plastic, reconstructive, and orthopedic surgery. Wrote several popular textbooks on orthopedics. At Bull Run was promoted to brigade surgeon and based on his experience wrote A Practical Treatise on Military History and Hygiene, and Surgical Memoirs of the War of Rebellion, and his opus-magnus, Treatise on the Principles and Practice of Surgery.

Louis Hellman, MD

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Louis Hellman, MD

1908-1990

Championed reproductive rights for all

by Robert C. Knapp, MD 1953

Chairman of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 1950-1970. Published many articles characterizing labor and uterine contractions, induction and stimulation of labor, and an atlas on fetal and gynecologic sonography. Co-editor of 12th, 13th, and 14th editions of Williams Obstetrics. Identified that frequently induced septic abortions caused significant proportion of obstetrical deaths. Supported nurse-midwives program. Strong advocate of family planning. Left for active role in population affairs at HEW.

Brian F. Hoffman, MD 1947

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Brian F. Hoffman, MD 1947

1925-2013

A founder of modern cardiac electrophysiology

by Mario Vassalle, MD

Former chairman of Pharmacology and associate dean at Columbia, following appointment as professor and acting chairman of Physiology at Downstate. Perfected microelectrode technique and with Paul Cranefield obtained cardiac intracellular recording to study normal cardiac impulses, arrhythmias, action of antiarrhythmic agents, and the application of basic research to patient care. Mentored two generations of clinical and basic scientists. Author of more than 500 publications. Member National Academy of Sciences and has received worldwide recognition, awards, and honors.

Dorothy Holden, MD

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Dorothy Holden, MD

1928-1988

Strong commitment to patient care and patient well-being

by Mark H. Jackson, MD 1987

Downstate Hematologist. Established first adult sickle cell clinic in 1972. Active in community education for hematological disorders. Encouraged family involvement in patient care for chronic disease states. Advocated with schools and employers for intermittently disabled sickle cell patients. With co-workers, published papers about natural history of urate overproduction in sickle cell anemia and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria with acute leukemia.

Joon-Ho Hong, MD, PhD

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Joon-Ho Hong, MD, PhD

Compassionate pioneer transplant surgeon

by Nabil Sumrani, MD

Early developer of the kidney transplant program, has performed over 1,000 kidney transplants and cared for over 2,000 kidney transplant recipients. Initiated individualization of immunosupression which has now become widely accepted. Published extensively on organ transplantation. Developed new technique of auxillary liver transplantation in dogs that is of interest for patients with inborn errors of hepatic metabolism. Focused on humane care of patients and continues to perform general surgery.

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For a short abstract of each honoree, select their name from the list on the left.

Pascal James Imperato, MD 1962, MPH & TM

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Pascal James Imperato, MD 1962, MPH & TM

Authority on public health, health care administration and tropical medicine

by Florence Kavaler, MD 1959, MS, MPH

Founding dean, School of Public Health at Downstate. Leading Africanist known for his expertise in African art, history and culture, especially Mali. Served as Commissioner of Health of NYC and chairman of the board of the Health and Hospitals Corporation. Published over 300 scientific articles, 100 book reviews, 7 medical texts, almost 100 non-medical articles mostly about Africa and African art, and 21 books about a variety of scholarly subjects. Numerous awards and honors.

Swaminath "Sam" K. Iyer, MBBS, MD

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Swaminath "Sam" K. Iyer, MBBS, MD

Rock and beacon for patients and staff

by Eugene W. Straus, MD 1967

A pillar of the medical staff at Downstate for over 40 years. Master gastrointestinal endoscopist. Exemplified dedication to patient care and mentoring of medical students and young staff members. Generous with his skills and time with generations of students, residents, fellows, and faculty who remain dedicated to him.

Jacqueline S. Jakway, PhD

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Jacqueline S. Jakway, PhD

1929-2008

Imparted a broad scope of knowledge with ease

by Samuel Marquez, PhD

A favorite of students, directed gross anatomy and was a member of the neuroscience, and histology faculty for over 40 years. Produced now famous trademark handouts for her superb lectures. Excelled in laboratory and lecture modes of teaching. Research on brain, especially thalamus, is of lasting significance.

Adrian "Felix" Kantrowitz, MD 1943D

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Adrian "Felix" Kantrowitz, MD 1943D

1918-2008

One of the greatest innovators in cardiac surgery

by The Editors

Conducted the first heart transplant in America, in Brooklyn, three days after the first heart transplant in the world. Invented an early heart-lung machine, an early internal pacemaker, and the first auxiliary left heart ventricle. Among other innovations his most far-reaching contribution is the intra-aortic balloon pump that boosts cardiac output and has been used in the past 35 years to treat acute heart failure in more than 1,500,000 patients. Still working on novel approaches to treat heart failure.

David A. Kaplan, MD, 1992H

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David A. Kaplan, MD, 1992H

1929-1994

Advocate for his patients, mentor to students, teacher to all

by Sarah Kaplan Browne, MD & Donald A. Gerber, MD, 1997H

First full-time director of Rheumatology at Downstate, grew the division. Research interests included heritable disorders of connective tissue, management of scleroderma, excretion of uric acid, osteoarthritis, and outcome and treatment of SLE. Also, long-standing dean of the fourth-year medical students for which he was beloved and respected. Was a scholar regarded for his integrity.

E. George Kassner, MD

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E. George Kassner, MD

1937-2005

A role model; a bright star among stars

by Harris L. Cohen. MD 1976

Outstanding pediatric radiologist and excellent director of Radiology at KCHC. Innovator, outstanding teacher, administrator, manager, editor, and writer. Knew a lot. His textbooks: Iatrogenic Disorders of the Fetus, Infant and Child, Atlas of Radiologic Imaging, and Imaging of Cardiac Disorders were works of scholarship. Strong ethical and social consciousness.

Michael Katz, MD 1956

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Michael Katz, MD 1956

Champion of mothers and babies; knows the importance of caring

by Barbara J. Stoll, MD

Senior vice president for Research and Global Programs at March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation. Chairman emeritus of Pediatrics at Columbia. Many administrative and leadership roles. Expertise in Public Health and Tropical Medicine. Broad research interests and important contributions to science and education. Champion of childhood vaccines and relationship between malnutrition and infection. Member Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. Erudite scholar and humanist.

Shirley L. Kauffman, MA, MD

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Shirley L. Kauffman, MA, MD

Instilled drive for perfection and attention to detail in residents

by Virginia Anderson, MD

Chief of Pediatric Pathology at Downstate for more than 40 years. Authored a series on pediatric soft tissue tumors and classic papers from her research on lung development. Widely regarded for meticulous dissections and disciplined approach to resident education and training. Careful and thorough descriptions of findings in disease conditions not well understood at that time helped enormously as knowledge of the etiologies emerged.

Florence Kavaler, MD 1959, MS, MPH

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Florence Kavaler, MD 1959, MS, MPH

Successful Public Health activist; quality care advocate

by Richard Sadovsky, MD 1974

Public health policy analyst, teacher, researcher. Published on her experience in hospital administration, malpractice analyses, and medical cases from Abraham Lincoln’s law practice. Perinatal mortality biostatistics with Schuyler Kohl, Louis Hellman, and Nicholson Eastman. When Medicaid enacted, initiated in-office audits of practitioners with Lowell Bellin. Ambulatory care guidelines. Investigations of corruption and fraud in nursing homes forced improvements. Directed Public Health Education study for the Millbank Fund.

Michael Kennéy, MD, 1983H

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Michael Kennéy, MD, 1983H

1904-1982

Eminent pathologist-parasitologist

by Vern Eveland, PhD

Former Downstate chief of Tropical Medicine and director of Parasitology. Educated at Warsaw University, MD from U. of Geneva, trained at the School of Tropical Medicine in Brussels. Belgian Colonial Medical Service and was medical officer for Katanga in southeastern Congo. Entered US just prior to WW II. Professor of Pathology at Downstate. Published magnificent Pathoparasitology monograph, distributed gratis on his insistence.

Donald F. Klein, MD 1952

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Donald F. Klein, MD 1952, DSc

Psychopharmacological therapy, panic attack concept, and pharmacological dissection

by The Editors

Professor of Psychiatry at Columbia. Pioneered use of psychopharmacology in treatment of psychiatric disorders. Extensive research. Numerous grants. Many prestigious professional awards. Authored 18 books, over 400 articles, more than 300 chapters, abstracts, reviews and other publications. On editorial boards of 10 journals. One of his priorities is informing the public of advances in psychiatric treatment. Has alleviated much human suffering.

Robert C. Knapp, MD 1953

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Robert C. Knapp, MD 1953

Improved the diagnosis and management of female genital tract malignancies

by Ovadia Abulafia, MD

Professor emeritus of gynecology at Harvard. Trained at KCHC under Louis Hellman. Famed for his operative skills. Perfected surgical techniques for gynecologic cancers. Described the dissection of paravesical and pararectal spaces in pelvic operations. Detection of the ovarian cancer antigen CA-125 in blood of patients with ovarian cancer lead to co-invention of an immunoassay for diagnosing and monitoring the course of ovarian carcinoma. Co-author of Gynecological Oncology, and published over 200 articles.

Schuyler G. Kohl, MD, MS, PhD

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Schuyler G. Kohl, MD, MS, PhD

1913-2000

Statistical analysis for charachterization of pregnancy; advocated family planning

by Richard H. Schwarz, MD, 1994H

Came to Downstate in 1950 with Louis Hellman. Faculty member for 55 years. Distinguished professor. Served many roles: dean and acting chairman of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Lead Admissions Committee and summer program for Brooklyn College students. Developed statistical analysis of obstetrical records. Strong advocate for family planning and obstetrical care for underserved women. Supporter of nurse midwifery. Family planning training of hundreds of instructors in Asia, Africa, and South America.

Kiyomi Koizumi, MD, MS, PhD

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Kiyomi Koizumi, MD, MS, PhD

Inside and outside hypothalamic neurons

by Mark Stewart, MD. PhD 1991

Chaired Physiology during difficult financial times. Worked to ensure excellence in teaching and research. Nurtured and protected faculty and staff. With Chandler Brooks first to record intracellularly from single spinal neurons. Made many substantial contributions to spinal cord, hypothalamic, and autonomic physiology. Established the link between sensory stimulation and the release of pituitary hormones. Extracellular recording from hypothalamic neurons and single neurons intracellularly. Produced nearly as many prominent scientists as her scientific papers.

Peter K. Kottmeier, MD, MS

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Peter K. Kottmeier, MD, MS

Pediatric trauma surgeon

by Francisca T. Velcek, MD

Following surgical residency with Clarence Dennis, was sent for training in pediatric surgery. Surgical innovator applying his research experience to clinical care. Established the first pediatric trauma unit in the U.S. at KCHC, predated the adult trauma unit. Initiated the pediatric ICU and the Children’s Emergency Room. Trained many pediatric trauma surgeons. Distinguished professor. Compassionate care-giver, outstanding teacher who continues to mentor after his retirement.

Samuel L. Kountz, MA, MD

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Samuel L. Kountz, MA, MD

1930-1981

Gifted with vision, optimism, and energy

by Khalid M. H. Butt, MD

Grandmother born into slavery. Granted a full scholarship to U. of Arkansas Medical School. First African-American Downstate professor and chairman of Surgery. Founded Transplant Program. Discovered that methylprednisolone could counter transplant rejection. Used his charisma to publicize organ donations. Raised the level of training of surgical residents. Productive scholarship, editorial board activity and visiting professorships. Believed his actions were important in countering racism.

Richard E. Kravath, MD 1960

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Richard E. Kravath, MD 1960

1935-2006

Relentless in pursuit of truth

by Angela Bennett, MD 1953

Directed in-patient pediatrics at Downstate. From Montefiore where he was director of Pediatric Intensive Care. Certified in neonatal and perinatal medicine and pulmonology. Many publications, co-authored textbook on fluid and electroytes. The Alumni Mentoring Program was his idea as were many other innovative initiatives. Caring physician, knowledgeable provocative teacher. Believed that there was no higher calling than teacher and physician.

Norman Kretchmer, PhD, MD 1952

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Norman Kretchmer, PhD, MD 1952

1923-1995

Biochemistry in human development

by Robert E. Greenberg, MD 1985

Chairman of Pediatrics at Stanford, then director National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Subsequently Nutritional Sciences professor at U. of California, Berkeley. Recognized that sequential gene expression fundamental to all developmental phenomena. Studied developmental biochemistry of intestinal enzymes and also child health in developing world. Member of the Institute of Medicine. Career exemplified teaching, broad understanding of child health, joys of collegiality, and excitement of research and never-ending learning.

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Christopher S. Lange, DPhil

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Christopher S. Lange, DPhil

Formulates paradigms

by Marvin Rotman, MD

Professor of Radiation Oncology. Many honors. Early worker in stem cell research. New interpretation of animal mortality curves. Contribution to understanding of aging. Showed that ratio of differentiated cells per stem cell rose with age, allowing cell errors. Proposed mechanism of spatial orientation in embryology and regeneration related to polarity in intrinsic electric field. Proposed a molecular basis for radiosensitivity and survival of irradiated cells. Developed a cancer stem cell hypothesis.

Jonathan T. Lanman, MD

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Jonathan T. Lanman, MD

1927-1988

Health policy activity and Population Council

by Steven W. Piecuck, MD 1979, MPH

Chairman of Pediatrics, Downstate,1960-1972. Was professor at NYU. Increased Pediatric staff and number of subspecialties. Broadened department’s research interests. Maintained own research in reproductive physiology and the retinopathy of prematurity. Participated in commissioning University Hospital of Brooklyn. Excellent teacher and clinical pediatrician. Mentored faculty and trainees. Subsequently directed Center for Research for Mothers and Children at NIH.

Harold E. Lebovitz, MD

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Harold E. Lebovitz, MD

Diagnosis and management of diabetes

by Samy I. McFarlane, MD 2005H

Chief of Endocrinology and Diabetes section and director of NIH sponsored Clinical Research Center, Downstate, 1982-1998. Director of Endocrinology at Duke, 1964-1982. Mentored many to prominent positions. Understanding of pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes, and mechanism of action of therapeutic agents. Published over 200 papers and 90 book chapters. Recipient of many awards. Continues to serve on advisory committees and editorial boards.

Stanley L. Lee, MD

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Stanley L. Lee, MD

Superb teacher, clinician, and researcher

by Harvey Dosik, MD

Leadership academic and administrative positions at Downstate. Professor of Medicine, acting president, and dean of College of Medicine. Was director of Hematology at Maimonides and later, director of Hematology/Oncology at Brookdale. Recently taught residents and fellows at Methodist. Published almost 100 papers and eight book chapters. First to publish existence of lupus anticoagulant and produced the first review of hairy cell leukemia.

Julius Lempert, MD 1913

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Julius Lempert, MD 1913

1891-1968

Father of modern otologic surgery

by John W. House, MD

Extraordinary technical skill. A great twentieth century innovative ear surgeon. As young physician, produced a motion picture demonstrating submucous resection of the septum. Introduced the endaural approach for mastoidectomies. His one-stage fenestration operation revolutionized treatment of otosclerosis and restored hearing to thousands of patients. In 1940s and 50s, physicians from around the world studied with Lempert who generously gave his time and taught with missionary zeal.

Susan M. Love, MD 1974

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Susan M. Love, MD 1974, MBA

Outspoken advocate for women's health

by The Editors

Founded Faulkner Breast Center in Boston, first American facility with all-women staff including surgeons, clinical nurse specialists, plastic surgeon, radiation therapist, and medical oncologist. After four years, recruited by UCLA, in 1992, to direct Breast Center with services for high-risk patients. Textbook and best-selling author. Wrote: Atlas of Surgical Techniques in Breast Surgery, Dr. Susan Love’s Breast Book, and Dr. Susan Love’s Hormone Book. Now research and advocacy interests.

A. Peter Lundin III, MD 1972

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A. Peter Lundin III, MD 1972

1944-2001

Remarkable physician and patient

by Eli A. Friedman, MD 1957

Epitome of courage and perseverance. Self-dialysis in college, due to hereditary renal disease. Came to Downstate for medical school and renal dialysis. After earning MD, medical residency at Downstate, and Nephrology fellowship at Harvard, joined faculty at Downstate. Rose to professor of Medicine all the while requiring dialysis. First to determine that heart disease in dialysis patients due to hypertension. Very bright clinician and investigator. Pleasant, positive personality.

Harold Lyons, MD 1940

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Harold Lyons, MD 1940

1913-1984

Teaching, research, and patient care

by Abraham Sanders, MD 1976 & Albert E. Heurich, MD

Director of pulmonary disease division, 1953-1983. Taught thousands of medical students, hundreds of residents, and dozens of fellows. Important contributions in tuberculosis treatment, asthma management, and pulmonary physiology in SLE. NIH training program in pulmonary medicine. Emphasized physiology and critical care medicine. Service had a physiology laboratory, and bronchoscopy suite. Greatly regarded, had extraordinary clinical acumen. Legacy extended widely.

Richard J. Macchia, MD

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Richard J. Macchia, MD, 1994H

Trained many urologists; helped promote colleagues and their achievements

by The Editors

Served as professor and chairman of the Department of Urology at Downstate from 1982 to 2009. Macchia graduated from New York Medical College in 1969. He trained in general surgery at St. Vincent'sHospital in New York City and completed his urology residency under Dr. Keith Waterhouse at Downstate. He was awarded the F. C. Valentine Fellowship of the New York Academy of Medicine which he served under the legendary Dr. Willet F. Whitmore, Jr. at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. He has co-authored over 130 scientificarticles and abstracts including 26 textbook chapters and proceedings.

Thomas P. Magill, MD

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Thomas P. Magill, MD

1903-1999

Early skeptic of excessive antibiotics use

by John P. Craig, MD, MPH, 1996H

Chairman of Microbiology and Immunology upon establishment of Downstate. Almost half a century of research in virology, epidemiology of influenza and development of vaccines. Earliest recognition of pliability of genetic determinants of influenza virus. First to describe influenza B virus. Recognized influenza A virus variability explained the escape from immunologic protection after previous infection. Concern for negative effects of wide use of antibiotics has come to fruition.

John G. Masterson, MD

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John G. Masterson, MD

1891-1962

Founded Gynecologic Oncology Service

by Richard Calame, MD

Gynecology residency at KCHC. Louis Hellman, chose him to develop gynecologic oncology, sent him to Memorial for training. Extraordinary surgical skills and leadership abilities. Upon return to Downstate, developed tumor service, tumor board, and fellowship in gynecologic cancer. Sought to prove that radical surgery could duplicate the cervical cancer results from radiotherapy.Recognized role that chemotherapy would play, and presented first paper on ovarian cancer management by alkylating agents.

William M. McCormack, MD 1963

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William M. McCormack, MD 1963

Dedicated teacher and tireless scholar

by John M. Quale, Jr., MD 1980

Professor of Medicine and ObGyn and chief of infectious diseases division at Downstate in 1982. Promoted to Distinguished Professor in 2005. On numerous editorial boards. Published over 200 papers. Recent publications concern sexually transmitted diseases. Definitive studies on genital mycoplasmas and the evaluation of victims of sexual assault. Edited textbook, Sexually Transmitted Diseases and written chapters in Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases and Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine.

Harry Z. Mellins, MD 1944, MS

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Harry Z. Mellins, MD 1944, MS

1921-2009

The radiologist perceived the shadow, sees a lesion, and imagines the man.

by Edward H. Smith, MD 1960

Returned to Downstate in 1956 as the first professor and chairman of Radiology, following residency at U. of Minnesota. Modernized the department and introduced subspecialties with expanded academic faculty. Enthusiastic, dynamic, and inspiring teacher, talented clinical radiologist. Worked closely with residents. Had many visiting professorships. In 1969, accepted invitation to become professor of Radiology at Harvard and director of Diagnostic Radiology. Numerous awards.

Hermann Mendez, MD

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Hermann Mendez, MD

Wrestled with the epidemic of his time

by Jeffrey M. Birnbaum, MD 1986, MPH

Early report of perinatal HIV infection. With Joan Hittelman, federal funding over 20 years ago for pioneering providers' network for HIV infected infants, children, and families for medical care, research, management, nutrition, and mental health services. Investigations: Women and Infants Transmission Study; Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study; Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group. For many hundreds changed this infection from a death sentence to a chronic disease.

Michael H. Merson, MD 1970

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Michael H. Merson, MD 1970

Director of Duke Global Health Institute

by Judith H. LaRosa, RN, PhD, 2005H

World Health Organization, Geneva, 1978-1995. Directed: diarrheal diseases, acute respiratory infections, global AIDS programs. First dean of Yale School of Public Health and lead an international HIV/AIDS research training program. Lead author of International Public Health: Diseases, Programs, Systems, and Policies. Current research:; strengthening health systems in countries of sub-Saharan Africa. Published over 150 medical articles and 12 textbook chapters. Numerous national and international boards and honors.

Ascher L. Mestel, MD 1952, MS

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Ascher L. Mestel, MD 1952, MS

Downstate Admissions Committee

by Constance Shames, MD 1963

Pediatric surgeon widely recognized for separation of Siamese twins. Directorship at Brookdale Hospital. Appointments at neighboring teaching hospitals. Volunteer instructor in pre-clinical courses. Visiting professorships at University of the West Indies, Hadassah Hospital in Jerusalem, and Hospital Sophia Aghia in Athens. Memberships in many medical, scientific, and community organizations. Sculptor and stained glass artist widely exhibited since retirement. Active in Alumni Association – College of Medicine.

Martin Metz, MD

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Martin Metz, MD

1919-1996

Students and staff were his patients

by Brian K. Metz, MD 1991

Professor of Medicine. Director of Student and House Staff Health Services, 1956-1990. Cared for many of faculty, particularly many prominent clinicians, investigators, and administrators. Institutional Review Board chairman for KCHC and Downstate, 1960-1985. Sought to provide excellent medical care for each student and staff member who became his patient.

Doris H. Milman, MD

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Doris H. Milman, MD

1917-2007

Articulate, with patience, respect, and humility

by Susanna L. Neumann, PhD

Child psychiatrist, Downstate. Acting chairperson, 1973-1975 and 1982. Established Child Guidance Clinic to train residents. Founded in-patient unit for chronically ill children. Significant contributions: minimal brain damage syndrome and outcome; illicit substance abuse effects on motivation and learning; adolescence; suicide; child assessment in the context of the family. Beloved faculty member. Remarkably she was paraplegic and wheelchair-bound since the 1940s.

Suzanne S. Mirra, MD 1969

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Suzanne S. Mirra, MD 1969

Active on search committees for dean and chairpersons

by Lisa R. Merlin, MD 1986

Professor and chairperson Department of Pathology since 1997. Neuropathologist. Investigations in neuropathology and molecular characterization of Alzheimer disease and other neurodegenerative disorders and educator for lay community about Alzheimer disease. Participated in Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer disease, developing the needed tools and manual that made assessment workable. Chaired Liason Committee on Medical Education self-study Task Force for Downstate 2002-2005.

Robert A. Moore, MD

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Robert A. Moore, MD

1901-1971

The biology of today is the medicine of tomorrow

by The Editors

First president of Downstate following merge with the State University of New York 1957-1966. Urologic pathologist. Author of classic textbook of Pathology. Publications: kidney, prostate, and testis diseases. First editor of Journal of Gerontology. Gifted medical administrator. Commitment to scientific base for medical education. Known for scrupulous integrity, remarkable intellectual acuity and precision. Shortly after WW II, dean of Washington University School of Medicine. Then served as vice chancellor of the University of Pittsburg Schools of the Health Professions.

Marvin Moser, MD 1947

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Marvin Moser, MD 1947

1930-2011

Hypertension complications can be prevented or reversed by lowering blood pressure

by The Editors

Professor of Medicine, Yale. Editor-in-chief Journal of Clinical Hypertension. Hypertension researcher and clinician for over 60 years. Evaluated every new antihypertensive medication since the 1950s. Prolific writer, authored over 500 scientific papers, 32 book chapters, and 11 books. On the editorial boards of several major medical journals and been a visiting professor at many universities in the United States and abroad. Recipient of numerous honors and awards. A powerful patient advocate cautioning against fraudulent claims for miracle cures.

Michael W. Mosesson, MD 1959

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Michael W. Mosesson, MD 1959

A stellar fibrinogen journey

by Dennis Galanakis, MD

For more than 50 years has steadily advanced the state of knowledge of fibrinogen and fibrin, in addition to discovering and characterizing the plasma form of fibronectin. His research achievements abound. His contributions are innovative, comprehensive, well reasoned, and meticulous with a distinctively unifying quality. Faculty appointments: Downstate 1967-1981. Mount Sinai Medical Center, Milwaukee, 1981-1999. Current, Blood Research Institute of the Blood Center of Wisconsin.

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Neuropathology Laboratory and trainees

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Neuropathology Laboratory and trainees 1956-1970

Many of the fellows trained achieved leadership academic positions

by Stanley M. Aronson, MD

Established neuropathology laboratory for diagnoses, investigative, undergraduate and graduate teaching supporting productive scholarship. Developed histochemistry and biochemistry resources and skeletal muscle diseases laboratory. Indexing of diagnostic findings supported scholarship. Consultations freely offered to the physicians and community hospitals. Provided fellowships under an NIH training grant, and training rotations for anatomic pathology, neurology, and neurosurgery residents. Initiated broad research programs with many scholarly publications.

Robert B. Nussenblatt, MD 1972, MPH

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Robert B. Nussenblatt, MD 1972, MPH

Expert in uveitis and inflammatory and AIDS-related eye diseases

by Igal Gery, PhD

Ophthalmologist at NIH. Established Laboratory of Immunology at National Eye Institute. Clinical and scientific director of the National Eye Institute and chief of Laboratory of Immunology. Has provided clinical fellowship program for over 20 years for ophthalmologists. Also chief of the Office of Protocol Services for NIH with responsibility for administering the 1100 NIH campus protocols. Many of his fellows have achieved leadership academic positions. Author or coauthor of over 500 publications and several books. Many awards and honors.

Jean Redman Oliver, MD, 1974H

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Jean Redman Oliver, MD, 1974H

1889-1976

Father of modern nephropathology

by Leopold G. Koss, MD, 2010H

Chairman of Pathology, 1929-1954. From Stanford. Studied renal disorders using meticulous but tedious microdissection of nephrons. Characterized the link between renal anatomy and function (“form follows function”). Published several books and over 100 papers covering a broad range of renal diseases from 1915 through 1968. Brilliant lecturer who included medical history and philosophy. First Distinguished Service Professor of the State University of New York. Numerous honors and awards. Endowed the biennial New York Pathological Society Jean Oliver Lecture.

Herbert Pardes, MD 1960

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Herbert Pardes, MD 1960

Expertise in education, research, clinical care and health policy

by Constance Shames, MD 1963

Psychiatrist. President and CEO of New York-Presbyterian Hospital. Previous director of NIMH, U.S. Assistant Surgeon General. Chairman of Psychiatry, vice president for Health Sciences, dean of faculty, at Columbia University. Chairman of Psychiatry, Downstate. Serves on numerous editorial boards. Wrote over 130 articles and chapters on mental health and academic medicine topics. Conducted international collaborations with India, China, and the former Soviet Union. Member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. Numerous awards and honors.

Ismail Parsa, MD

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Ismail Parsa, MD

1933-1988

Inspiration to students, colleagues and all who knew him

by Andrew Parsa, MD 1996

Professor of Pathology and School of Graduate Studies and director of Histocompatibility and Organ Preservation Laboratories at Downstate. Pioneered innovative ways to identify donor-recipient matches and optimize renal organ transplantation. Research: induced pancreatic malignancy in experimental animal and adult and fetal human organ cultures by chemical carcinogens. Developed monoclonal antibodies to normal human acinar and duct cells to prove cellular origin of the cancers. Fertile creative mind. Died at an early age.

William E. Paul, MD 1960

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William E. Paul, MD 1960

Discovered the cytokine Interleukin-4, key regulator of the immune system

by Helen Durkin, PhD, 2002H

Chief of Laboratory of Immunology of National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Director of NIH Office of AIDS Research,1994-1997. Studied mechanisms of action of type I cytokines, principally IL-4, and investigation of the differentiation of naïve T-cells. Important contributions to cytokine biology, lymphocyte dynamics, T-cell antigen-recognition, and B-cell development. Member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. Author of 578 papers and textbooks. Serves on many editorial boards. Numerous honors and awards.

Matthew R. Pincus, PhD, MD 1979

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Matthew R. Pincus, PhD 1972, MD 1979

Pioneered development of anti-cancer peptides

by Wilbur F.B. Bowne, MD 1994

Professor of Pathology at Downstate and chairman of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at New York Harbor Veterans Affairs Health Care System. Co-editor of Henry’s Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods, 21st Edition. Outstanding teacher, mentored many residents, fellows and faculty to successful advancement. Important research contributions with collaborator Josef Michl, MD: oncogenesis and oncoprotein structure, mitogenic signal transduction, and design of anti-cancer peptides. Received many patents, grants, and awards.

Calvin H. Plimpton, MD, DMedSc

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Calvin H. Plimpton, MD, DMedSc

1918-2007

Convivial, ready access from students and faculty

by Richard Schwarz, MD, 1994H

President of Downstate, 1971-1979. Campus unrest with demonstrations and sit-ins. Facilitated growth and development of several landmark advances. His wife, Ruth Talbot Plimpton, established Child Life Center to help children overcome fears through therapeutic play. President, Amherst College, 1960-1971. Set stage for admission of women. President, American University, Beirut, 1984-1990, guided that school during great danger to its faculty.

Stanley Plotkin, MD 1956

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Stanley Plotkin, MD 1956

Vaccinologist

by Michael Katz, MD 1956

At Wistar Institute, 1964 rubella epidemic stimulated him to create a vaccine that proved superior. Continued other vaccine developments. 600 publications and five editions of his co-edited Vaccines. Commitment to science. An insatiable curiosity. Has precise, rigorous mind with broad intellectual interests. Focused on practical problems of importance to human health. Member Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and French National Academy of Medicine. Recipient of many honors and awards.

Charles Plotz, MD 1944

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Charles Plotz, MD 1944

At the dawn of rheumatology and immunology

by Maja Nowakowski, PhD

Emeritus professor of Medicine, 1991. With Downstate since 1941 as a medical student, resident, founder of the rheumatology section, and department head. Studied the effects of newly introduced steroids. Invented Latex Fixation Test for detection of rheumatoid factor. With many modifications, now in wide use for rapid antigen detection to identify and type bacterial pathogens. First chairman of Family Practice. Followed Duncan Clark as chancellor of the medical honor society Alpha Omega Alpha. Many honors and awards.

Howard W. Potter, MD

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Howard W. Potter, MD

Established psychoanalytical training at our school

by Michael Berzofsky, MA, PhD

Chairman of Psychiatry and dean at Downstate. Established a graduate school of Psychoanalytic Medicine. Contributed to Psychiatry in many ways. Championed psychoanalytic training in a university setting and urged low-cost provision of treatment. Tried to bring care and treatment of mental retardation into the province of psychiatry about which he published extensively, especially regarding children. Sought the best care for all patients proportional to the severity of their condition.

Qutub H. Qazi, MD, MA, PhD

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Qutub H. Qazi, MD, MA, PhD

Taught students and colleagues about genetics

by Asif Q. Qazi, MD 1993

Directed genetics program at Downstate for 30 years. Pediatric residency at Downstate, then earned a master’s degree and PhD in Genetics at U. of Toronto. Founded Downstate Genetics Clinic and cytogenetics laboratory for chromosome studies. Expert in dermatoglyphics. Published over 60 papers and over a dozen book chapters. Expert on fetal alcohol syndrome. On State Task Force to educate women about harmful effects of alcohol during pregnancy. Consulted widely by Brooklyn physicians.

Alan Rabson, MD 1950

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Alan Rabson, MD 1950

1926-2012

A half century of service to cancer research

by Robert Wiltrour, MD, PhD

Pathologist. National Cancer Institute (NCI) since 1955. Research, viral oncology. First demonstrated that latent herpes virus can reside in human trigeminal ganglion. Found that human cells can be simultaneously infected by two different DNA viruses. Clinical professorships of Pathology at Georgetown, George Washington, and Uniformed Services University. Authored or co-authored over 180 scientific publications. Deputy director NCI since 1995. Prior 20 years director, NCI’s Division of Cancer Biology. Member of Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences.

James B. Ranck, Jr., MD

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James B. Ranck, Jr., MD

Helped merge neurobiology and psychology into neuroscience

by John Kubie, PhD 1977

Professor of Physiology at Downstate since 1975. Biophysicist who specialized in the physics of current flow in brain tissue. By recording from a single brain cell, studied linkage between single cell neurons of hippocampus and the mind. Started hippocampal laboratory. Known as a great teacher. Taught neuroscience and physiology to generations of neuroscientists and medical students. Promoted to Distinguished Teaching Professor in 2005.

Madu Rao, MD

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Madu Rao, MD

Consulting resource on asthma

by Philip Steiner, MD

Professor of Pediatrics. At Downstate 1969-2003. Developed and directed the Pediatric: Asthma Center, Pulmonary Function Laboratory, Sleep Apnea Laboratory and Neonatal Metabolic Laboratory. Directed Pediatric Pulmonary Division. Many papers and presentations on asthma and other pediatric pulmonary conditions. Trained many pediatric pulmonologists. Dr. Rao with wife established a foundation for research awards to those training in pediatric pulmonary program and scholarships for children with asthma.

Ronald F. Rieder, MD

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Ronald F. Rieder, MD

1933-2012

Studied abnormal human hemoglobins and thalassemia syndromes

by William Solomon, MD, 2009H and Albert S. Braverman, MD

Professor of Medicine, Director of Hematology. Downstate 1967-2007. Characterization of structure, synthesis, and clinical presentation of several new unstable hemoglobins with hemolytic anemia. Demonstrated that short-chain fatty acids caused transcriptional upregulation of gamma globin expression. Augmentation is currently mainstay of sickle cell anemia treatment. Career encompassed eras of protein biochemistry, genetic code, and recombinant DNA technology and he used all three for his studies.

Arthur Rose, MD, 2009H

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Arthur Rose, MD, 2009H

Initiated student exchange with his alma mater, U. of Bristol

by Joan B. Cracco, PhD 2003H

Professor of Neurology and Pediatrics, Downstate 1975-2010. Director, Pediatric Neurology for 20 years. Excellent clinician, committed to teaching and mentoring students and residents. Publications include polymyositis and pseudotumor cerebri. Landmark study of EEG in neonatal seizures. Basic research involved studies of mechanism of bilirubin encephalopathy and neurotoxicity of hexachlorophene.

C. Julian Rosenthal, MD

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C. Julian Rosenthal, MD

1938-2000

Forged the foundation for modern oncologic practice

by Albert S. Braverman, MD

Established possibly the first outpatient chemotherapy facility in the nation. Trained oncologic nurses for drug administration and patient support. Pioneered combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Discovered and characterized serum amyloid-associated protein. Charming, gentle, and affable. His workaholic schedule, vast knowledge, and intense idealism made him larger than life.

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Mitchell S. Rosenthal, MD 1960

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Mitchell S. Rosenthal, MD 1960

Founded Phoenix House in 1967

by The Editors

Psychiatrist. Heads Phoenix House. Substance abuse considered incurable when he started treating addicts. Now with nearly 100 programs in eight states, treats almost 5,500 patients daily. Pioneering work in drug addiction. Recognized the importance of families in arresting drug abuse. Authority on the treatment and prevention of substance abuse. Consultant to state and federal governments. Published books and papers. Lectures at Columbia. Many awards and honors.

Sheldon P. Rothenberg, MA, MD

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Sheldon P. Rothenberg, MS, MD

1929-2012

Knowledgeable about radioimmunossay

by Maria DaCosta, MD

Professor of Medicine, Downstate 1980-2007. Outstanding hematology investigator and clinician. His studies altered concepts and improved diagnoses and management. Developed methods to measure vitamin B12, folic acid, intrinsic factor, receptors, autoantibodies, and vitamin B12 binding proteins. Identified folate binding proteins in study of folate coenzymes. Demonstrated autoantibodies to folate binding protein in serum from many women with neural tube defect pregnancy supporting need for additional folate. Many publications and awards.

Marvin Rotman, MD

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Marvin Rotman, MD

Advocated concomitant chemotherapy and radiation

by Samuel Packer, MD 1966

Professor and chairman of Radiation Oncology at Downstate for over 30 years. Promoted to Distinguished Professor in 2002. Active investigator. Studied chemotherapy in radiation treatment of solid tumors. Chemotherapy served as radiation sensitizer. Used different drugs and tested efficacy of continuous infusion. Co-edited three textbooks with Dr. Julian Rosenthal on the use of concomitant therapies. Published 150 articles. Received a gold medal and many awards and honors.

Nathan Rudolph, MD

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Nathan Rudolph, MD

Driving force in neonatal research

by Steven P. Piecuch, MD 1979, MPH

Professor of Pediatrics, neonatologist, Downstate. Active investigator particularly of selenium metabolism and oxidant injury. Had encyclopedic knowledge of neonatology and of general pediatrics. Excellent clinical judgment. Outstanding bedside teacher, but demanding. Always spoke to families in a caring, empathetic manner explaining their infant’s condition. Was role model and mentor to generations of students and fellows.

Todd C. Sacktor, MD

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Todd C. Sacktor, MD

How brain stores long-term memories

by Roger Q. Cracco, MD 1999H

Professor of Physiology and Pharmacology and Neurology. Came to Downstate in 1990. Increased strength of synaptic connections was thought to be physiologic mechanism for long-term memory. Discovered molecule PKMzeta, that seemed to be responsible for synaptic strengthening. ZIP blocked PKMzeta. After ZIP was injected spatial memory was lost. After ZIP was no longer effective, spatial memory was still erased but new spatial memories could be learned and stored.

Franklin R. Scalia, PhD, 1964

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Franklin R. Scalia, PhD, 1964

Encyclopedic knowledge of neuroanatomy

by John A. Lewis, PhD

Professor, Neuroanatomy, 1963-present. Earlier work on olfactory and vomeronasal systems lead to new findings. Then studied visual system and confirmed findings of retinal projections in multiple species. Used same techniques to study nerve regeneration and showed the defined growth orientation. Now, uses molecular probes to identify those molecules guiding axonal growth. Superb and demanding teacher. Great experimental skill and talent. Gifted artist of brain.

Gerald Schiffman, PhD

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Gerald Schiffman, PhD

Tested efficacy of Pneumococcus vaccines and antibody titers produced

by The Editors

Distinguished professor emeritus of microbiology and immunology. At Downstate since 1970. Worked with Robert Austrian to develop improved, highly effective vaccine for infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae, introduced in 1978. Large-scale testing confirmed its efficacy. Developed a measure of immune system function he used for elderly and immune-deficient patients. Retired in 1997 but continues to participate in pneumococcal reference laboratory.

Richard H. Schwarz, MD, 1994H

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Richard H. Schwarz, MD, 1994H

Deft interpersonal touch

by Howard Minkoff, MD

Chairman of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Downstate. From U. of Pennsylvania in 1978 where he was founding director of Maternal-Fetal Medicine Division. Admired for his clinical skills, ability, and humility. Consulted widely. Advocate for patient care. Promoted subspecialization. Active in specialty societies. Accessible to staff and trainees. Trained many leaders of specialty. Served Downstate as dean, provost, and acting president.

Alexander Sedlis, MD

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Alexander Sedlis, MD

Important contributions in gynecologic oncology

by Neil S. Prose, MD

Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Came to Downstate in 1980 after 24 years at New York Medical College. Diagnostic staging for cervical cancer known as the Sedlis criteria. Demonstrated role of radiation therapy. Authored more than 80 publications and numerous book chapters. Supervises culposcopy clinic at KCH and gynecologic pathology conferences for residents. Described as the modest, gentle, kind, and sensitive physician he has always been.

Sam Seifter, PhD

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Sam Seifter, PhD

1916-2009

Very popular outstanding lecturer

by Julian L. Seifter, MD

Biochemist LICM 1945-1954. Researcher. Taught medical biochemistry, physiology and histology. Student favorite. Biochemist at LIJ and Einstein. Collagen structure, crosslinks and carbohydrate binding. Research interests many and varied, continuing interest in collagen, effects of aging, glycation. Wrote several extensive reviews: energy metabolism of liver, carbohydrate metabolism in diabetes, biochemical reactions of ascorbic acid, and chapters on proteins. Elected to Alpha Omega Alpha. Broad cultural interests. A poet.

Alan R. Shalita, MD, 2000H

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Alan R. Shalita, MD, 2000H

One of world's foremost experts in acne

by Hilary Baldwin, MD

Professor and chairman of Dermatology at Downstate 1980-Present. Promoted to Distinguished Professor in 1996. Active teaching with development of strong, highly regarded residency. Focus on patient care. Research: antibiotics in enzyme and chemotaxis inhibition, role of bacteria in the pathogenesis of acne, use of retinoid in treatment of acne. Trained many leaders in specialty. Lectures extensively. Many honors.

Abraham Shulman, MD

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Abraham Shulman, MD

Dedicated to "stopping the ringing"

By Richard Rosenfeld, MD

Professor of Otolaryngology and director of division. Following residency, fellowship with Julius Lempert. Clinical interest in hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo. Research: neurosensory hearing loss, electrical stimulation of cochleovestibular system and mechanisms of tinnitus production. Published textbook, Tinnitus; Diagnosis and Treatment, over 200 articles and book chapters.

George M. Sternberg, MD

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George M. Sternberg, MD

1839-1915

Hoagland Laboratories in Brooklyn – the golden age of bacteriology

by Michael Augenbraun, MD

Career Army physician-bacteriologist. Studied yellow fever, malaria, tuberculosis, typhoid, and smallpox. First to isolate the pneumococcus. America’s leading expert on infectious diseases following publication of his 900-page Manual of Bacteriology. Appointed the first director of the Hoagland Laboratory in 1886, after his lecture to the LICH Alumni Association about bacteria that cause disease. Never full-time, he organized Hoagland while working at Johns Hopkins. Resigned when appointed U.S. Surgeon General in 1893.

M.A.Q. Siddiqui, PhD, 2007H

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M.A.Q. Siddiqui, PhD, 2007H

Journey to the heart of molecular cardiology

by Jason Lazar, MD

Chairman of Cell Biology since 1987. Promoted to Distinguished Professor. Molecular cardiology leader. Under his leadership department flourished with increased research funding and many new post-docs. Maintained active research program and administrative responsibilities, elucidating molecular patho-
genesis of myocardial hypertrophy. Highly productive investigator. Published over 150 papers and several book chapters and review articles. Frequent presenter at conferences. Many trained under him have taken prestigious leadership roles. Expanded administrative responsibilities with Department realignments.

Emanuel Silverstein, MD 1954, PhD

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Emanuel Silverstein, MD 1954, PhD

Non-specific ACE elevation in sarcoidosis

by Daniel D. Silverstein, MD 2000

Chairman of Biophysics at Downstate. Research focus on rennin-angiotensin system. In sarcoidosis found elevated levels of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in serum and lymph nodes and angiotensin II in epithelioid and giant cells. Showed that serum ACE levels correlated with disease activity and were reduced by glucorticoids. Discovered increased ACE levels in a large number of metabolic, endocrine and renal conditions.

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Alexander J. C. Skene, MD 1863

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Alexander J. C. Skene, MD 1863

1838-1900

A hero's bust in Grand Army Plaza

by Kathleen Powderly, PhD

Union surgeon during Civil War, created Ambulance Corps, now almost universal. At end of war returned to LICH for the rest of his career. Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, dean, and president. First president of Alumni Association. Officer of many local and national professional societies. Excellent diagnostician. Paraurethral Skene’s glands named for him. Authored over 100 articles, five textbooks, and one novel. Talented sculptor.

Ralph Snyderman, MD 1965

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Ralph Snyderman, MD 1965

Advocate for medical education and excellence in teaching

by Josef Michl, MD

Emeritus Chancellor for Health Affairs at Duke U., president of Duke U. Health System and professor of Medicine. Left Duke in 1987 to join a biomedical technology firm. Returned in 1989-2004. Specialty: Rheumatology and Immunology. Member IOM of the National Academy of Sciences. Numerous honors and awards. Urged that medical schools be actively involved in finding solutions for America’s health care problems and develop cost effective, accessible, quality health care.

Leslie H. Sobin, MD 1959

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Leslie H. Sobin, MD 1959

Bard of Pathology. Wrote Tales of the Ampulla of Vater

by Constantine Axiotis, MD, 2008H

WHO professor of Pathology in Afghanistan 1965-1968. Then WHO Pathologist in Cancer Care Unit in Geneva 1970-1981. Edited successive monographs on histologic classification of tumors. Then AFIP to director of scientific publications. Co-editor 3rd and 4th AFIP Atlas of Tumor Pathology and of TNM 4th, 5th , and 6th editions of Classification of Malignant Tumors. Author or co-author of over 300 articles, chapters, and books.

Mahendra Somasundaram, MD

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Mahendra Somasundaram, MD

Data 1st, formulation 2nd , laboratory and imaging studies 3rd

by Paul Maccabee, MD

Neurology attending, 1975. Director of Residency Training 1975-2000. Made major contributions to clinical neurology. Described as a dedicated teacher, superb with patients. Previously EEG Fellowship. Neurology training at Cornell.

Lucy Frank Squire, MD, 1991H

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Lucy Frank Squire, MD, 1991H

1915-1996

Reading light from dark

by Jay W. MacMoran, MD

Professor of Radiology,1966-1994. Educator and mentor to generations of students. Exceptionally popular teacher. Gave fourth-year radiology elective, often described as the peak of their educational experience in medical school. Landmark Fundamentals of Radiology remains standard text after forty years. Lead author of several other influential works. Most translated widely. Many radiology awards.

Phillip Steiner, MD

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Phillip Steiner, MD

1928-2011

An unending devotion to patient care

by Madu Rao, MD

Professor of Pediatrics, Downstate,1968-2002. Director pediatric pulmonary division. Fellowship trained many respected pediatric pulmonologists. Presented many papers on multi-drug resistant tuberculosis in children. Wrote the guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of children with tuberculosis for the NYC Board of Health.

George M. Sternberg, MD

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George M. Sternberg, MD

1839-1915

Hoagland Laboratories in Brooklyn – golden age of bacteriology

by Michael Augenbraun, MD

Career Army physician-bacteriologist. Studied yellow fever, malaria, tuberculosis, typhoid, and smallpox. First to isolate pneumococcus. America’s leading expert on infectious diseases following publication of his 900-page Manual of Bacteriology. Appointed the first director of Hoagland Laboratory in 1886, after his lecture to LICH Alumni Association about bacteria that cause disease. Never full-time, he organized Hoagland while working at Johns Hopkins. Resigned when appointed U.S. Surgeon General in 1893.

Eugene W. Straus, MD 1967

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Eugene W. Straus, MD 1967

1941-2011

Gifted clinician, superb educator

by Stephan L. Kamholtz, MD, 1993H

Professor of Medicine, chief of Gastroenterology, 1983-2002. An outstanding clinical and laboratory scientist. Research: identification, characterization, physiologic assessment of gastrointestinal peptide hormones, 1972-1980, resulted in over 20 publications. Authored over 80 scientific papers, 20 book chapters, a biography of Rosalind Yalow, PhD, and recently with his son Alex published Medical Marvels, the 100 Greatest Advances in Medicine. A new novel, Apollo’s Kiss, is in press.

Barnet M. Sultzer, PhD

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Barnet M. Sultzer, PhD

Mechanism of LPS activation and host responses

by Khaled Aby-Lawi, PhD

Professor of Microbiology and Immunology at Downstate, 1964-1994. Developed a test tube hemagglutination inhibition assay to test for pregnancy. Was the standard test for ten years. Major work: lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin and its effects. Extensively investigated the genetics of host responsiveness to bacterial endotoxin. Served on several editorial boards and published about 100 articles.

George B. Talbert, PhD

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George B. Talbert, PhD, 1991H

1921-2008

Played role of Elvis Presley in medical school follies

by Susan M. Talbert, MD 1986

Professor of Anatomy at Downstate. Taught gross anatomy and embryology with quiet manner, great skill, dedication. Popular and respected. Numerous teaching awards. Acting chairman and on Admissions Committee for many years. Studied and published on effects of aging on fertility of female reproductive system.

Richard A. Taylor, MD 1903

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Richard A. Taylor, MD 1903

1870-1950

Compassionate physician, superb clinician

by Randall D. Bloomfield, MD 1953

Orphan in St. Kitts, West Indies. Adopted by German physician who taught him classics and medicine. Emigrated to US Midwest, then to LICM. Strong background in anatomy and microbiology. Tutored many classmates. Prizes for chemistry, physiology, and obstetrics. Helped many youths who aspired to become physicians. Beloved by patients, respected by colleagues, and admired by neighbors.

Frederick Tilney, MD 1903

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Frederick Tilney, MD 1903. PhD

1875-1938

Pioneer American neurologist

by Yaacov Anziska, MD 2000

After KCH internship, studied neurology in Berlin. Anatomist and professor of Neurology, Columbia U. PhD, 1912 and Sci.D, 1929. Director of Neurological Institute 1935-1938. Authored: The Form and Function of the Central Nervous System and The Brain from Ape to Man. Published about foundations of criminology and pathophysiology of juvenile delinquents. Expert on pituitary gland. Leadership of several neurology societies.

Richard C. Troutman, MD, 2002H

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Richard C. Troutman, MD, 2002H

Trained many in microsurgery

By Norman B. Medow, MD 1966

Professor emeritus and former chairman of Ophthalmology at Downstate, since 1955. Focused on disorders of eye’s anterior segment. Oversaw development of eye microscopes and microsurgery, sutures and needles. Many firsts: anterior chamber intraocular lens implant, corrected astigmatism, Brought new techniques to Downstate in 1965. Authored or co-authored over 150 publications and nine books including Microsurgery of the Eye. Member and president of many societies. Many lectures, awards and honors.

Mario Vassalle, MD

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Mario Vassalle, MD

There are no problems, only solutions

by Macello Rota, PhD

Trained in cardiac electrophysiology with Brian Hoffman at Downstate, 1960-1962. After two years in Bern returned to Physiology at Downstate and rose rapidly to professor in 1971. Intracellular electrolyte measurements and whole-cell patch-clamps to elucidate mechanisms of normal and abnormal heart beats. Outstanding teacher. Scientific contributions include almost 400 papers, abstracts and reviews, and 4 books. Literary works include poems, aphorisms, and philosophical essays in English and Italian.

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Eleanor Z. Wallace, MD 1951

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Eleanor Z. Wallace, MD 1951

1927-2006

EBM will find the best available answers

Professor of Medicine until 1985. Endocrinologist with expertise in reproductive endocrinology. Chief of Medicine at Brooklyn VA and in later years chief of general internal medicine at Long Island Jewish. Other academic appointments: SUNY Stony Brook, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and CUNY Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education. Popular teacher and student mentor. Strong advocate for evidence-based medicine (EBM). Active in professional societies.

Stanley L. Wallace, MD

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Stanley L. Wallace, MD

1923-1989

Frequency of myocardial infarct in gout

Professor of Medicine at Downstate, 1951-1989. Chief of Internal Medicine, director of Medicine, and acting chief of rheumatology. Published extensively on rheumatic and arthritic diseases. Research on the pharmacology of gout. Major clinical study on the relationship between arteriosclerosis and gout. Prominent in local and national professional societies.

Keith Waterhouse, MD

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Keith Waterhouse, MD

1929-2009

Innovative and creative to unsolved problems

by Richard Macchia, MD, 1999H

Professor of Surgery at Downstate six years after appointment as instructor. Four years later Urology became a separate department and he was founding chairman. Contributions in urologic trauma, pediatric urology, and reconstructive urology with significant publications with colleagues in each area. Also contributed work and publications on erectile dysfunction, cryosurgery, hemodialysis, and transplantation. Member of prominent professional societies. Editorial boards of many urologic journals. Numerous awards.

R. Janet Watson, MD

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R. Janet Watson, MD

1913-1969

At outset of molecular biology and molecular medicine

by Ronald F. Reider, MD

Hematologist, Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics, Downstate. Interest in anemia. Saw many cases of sickle cell anemia in African-Americans. Noted that sickle cells were rare in blood of newborns who later developed sickle cell disease. Appearance of sickle cells coincided with change-over from fetal to adult form of hemoglobin. Publication in 1948 helped establish that an abnormal adult hemoglobin was responsible for this genetic disorder.

Max Harry Weil, MD 1952, PhD

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Max Harry Weil, MD 1952, PhD

1927-2011

Helped save the lives of critically ill patients worldwide

A father of critical care medicine. Leader in cardio-pulmonary resuscitation. Pioneered first modern intensive care unit in early 1960s. Within ten years almost every hospital in America had such facilities. Original research on sepsis and septic and circulatory shock. Chief of cardiology at City of Hope Medical Center. President, Institute of Critical Care Medicine. Frequent speaker at international symposia. Coauthor of several texts and over 1,100 other publications. Many honors.

William Alanson White, MD 1891

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William Alanson White, MD 1891

1870-1937

In the patient's best interest

by Michael Berzofsky, MD, PhD

Neurologist, teacher, and hospital administrator had a major role in modern psychiatry and acceptance of Freud’s theories. Superintendent of Government Hospital for the Insane in Washington, DC, later called Saint Elizabeth’s Hospital. Reorganized for improved patient care, introduced psychoanalysis therapy for mental disorders. Over 300 publications and 17 books including his co-authored texts: Modern Treatment of Nervous and Mental Diseases (1913) and Diseases of the Nervous System (1915). Many honors.

Donald E. Wilson, MD

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Donald E. Wilson, MD

Respects and celebrates cultural diversity

by Eugene W. Straus, MD 1967

Professor and chairman of Medicine at Downstate, 1980-1991. Professor and dean, U. of Maryland School of Medicine,1991-2006 where he expanded research and funding. Improved faculty and student minority representation. Made contributions on prostaglandins in gastrointestinal mucosal protection, blood flow, and the mechanism of stress induced damage. Also many insightful reviews. Active nationally on health policy. Many honors. Many professional associations, and IOM of the National Academy of Sciences.

Sidney J. Winawer, MD 1956

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Sidney J. Winawer, MD 1956

Contributed to prevention of colorectal cancer

by The Editors

Director of Integrative Medicine Program at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Former chief of gastroenterology for 20 years. Principle investigator in NIH National Polyp Study. Raised public awareness of need for early colonic cancer detection. Over 250 scientific papers and several books; he has written a memoir Healing Lessons about his wife’s struggle with metastatic gastric cancer. Numerous honors and awards.

Henryk M. Wisniewski, MD, PhD

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Henryk M. Wisniewski, MD, PhD

1931-1999

Pioneer in Alzheimer’s research

by Piotr Kozlowski, MD

Director of New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, 1976-1999. Neuropathologist, authored or co-authored over 700 scientific publications on a variety of subjects including: neuropathology of aging and dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, neuronal degeneration, demyelinating diseases, Down syndrome, blood-brain barrier, neurotoxicology and neurodegeneration. Many classic publications.

Evelyn M. Witkin, PhD

photo of Evelyn M. Witkin, PhD, courtesy of Nick Romanenko and Rutgers University.

Evelyn M. Witkin, PhD

Created field of DNA mutagenesis and DNA repair

by Miriam Feuerman, PhD

Geneticist, Department of Medicine, Downstate, 1955-1971, Biological responses to DNA damage. Following work at Cold Spring Harbor, investigated how mutations occur in DNA and how they may be corrected. Professor, Douglass College, Rutgers, understanding cellular response to UV. Continued to study the SOS response to UV radiation in bacteria until her retirement in 1991. Many awards. Elected to National Academy of Sciences in 1977. National Medal of Science in 2002.

Herman A. Witkin, PhD

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Herman A. Witkin, PhD

1916-1979

Cognition and personality

by Steven Friedman, PhD

Professor, director of Research Training, Department of Psychiatry, Downstate 1951-1971. Studied the interface between cognition and personality. Programmatic research on cognitive styles and individual, group, and sex differences. Published Personality Through Perception: An Experimental and Clinical Study (1954) and his widely quoted Psychological Differentiation: Studies of Development (1962). Went to Educational Testing Service to study the educational implications of cognitive style. Many awards and honors.

Arthur H. Wolintz, MD 1962

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Arthur H. Wolintz, MD 1962

1937-2011

Inspiring and caring teacher

by Douglas Lazzaro, MD 1990

Professor, Department of Ophthalmology, Downstate and director of residency training. Chairman 1983-1995. Promoted to Distinguished Professor in 1995.Director of Ophthalmology and neuro-ophthalmology at Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center, 1971- Present. Major role in teaching and conducts teaching rounds at several affiliate institutions. Neuro-ophthalmologist. Author or co-author of 55 publications and several books. Councillor of Eta chapter of Alpha Omega Alpha (1992).

Robert K.S. Wong, PhD

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Robert K.S. Wong, PhD

Extended understanding of hippocampal circuitry

by Hillary B. Michelson, PhD

Professor and chairman of Department of Pharmacology since 1990 and of combined Physiology and Pharmacology in 1998. Promoted to Distinguished Professor. Research focused on mechanisms underlying generation of seizures. Inhibitory action of GABA may have a role in memory formation. His laboratory has had uninterrupted NIH funding for thirty years. Authored 100 publications and book chapters. Demonstrates that basic research provides the most thorough understanding of diseases and their treatment.