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Division of Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine

CURRICULUM

 

Pulmonary Disease Curriculum
Critical Care Medicine Curriculum
Academic Component

Pulmonary Disease Curriculum

Duration: 24 months
Rotations (typical distribution):

 

Inpatient consultation (x10 months total)
Medical/mixed intensive care units
Pulmonary Function Lab / Sleep Lab (KCHC):
Pulmonary elective / research:
Vacation:

Year 1 Year 2
4-6 months
3 months
1 month
2 months
1 month
5-7 months
2 months
- - -
3 months
1 month
 


Ambulatory care:
Each fellow is assigned to a continuity clinic for one half-day per week throughout the two years in Pulmonary Medicine. The majority of assignments are to the Chest Clinic at KCHC, a general pulmonary clinic with an emphasis on the treatment and prevention of tuberculosis. Fellows also attend general pulmonary clinics while rotating at the three affiliate hospitals, and a cystic fibrosis clinic is available at LICH (under Pediatrics).
Procedures: Fellows gain "hands-on" experience in all standard respiratory function tests, polysomnography, comprehensive exercise testing, and in the invasive procedures routinely practiced in pulmonary and critical care medicine. An exposure to some specialized procedures, such as airway stent placement, is also available.

 
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Critical Care Medicine Curriculum

Duration: 12 months (usually follows 2 years of Pulmonary Medicine subspecialty training)
Rotations (typical distribution):
Medical/mixed intensive care units:
Cardiac Care Unit (UHB or KCHC): 1 month
Critical care electives (3 months total):
Cardiothoracic ICU, UHB:
Surgical ICU, KCHC:
Neurosurgical ICU, KCHC: 1 month
(other CCM electives may be arranged, subject to approval)
Vacation:

7 months
1 month

1 month
1 month
1 month

1 month

 
 
Ambulatory care:
CCM fellows spend one afternoon per week in the KCHC Chest Clinic during their rotations at the DMC campus.
 
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Academic Component

Conferences: The division offers 5 formal conferences and a journal club at DMC, which are mandatory for fellows in all three years of training. There are additional conferences available at the affiliated institutions, and a monthly interhospital conference rotates among 4 institutions in Brooklyn. Pulmonary fellows typically present 5-7 formal topic reviews per year, while CCM fellows present 4-5.

Research: All fellows are expected participate in at least one research project (usually clinical) and to prepare data for presentation at a national meeting (usually ATS or ACCP). Fellows are encouraged to develop their own studies, but they may also join research projects initiated by faculty members. Expert guidance in study design and statistical analysis is available through the Scientific Computing Center at DMC, and the curriculum includes an introductory course in inferential statistics. The main topic areas for fellows' projects in recent years have included: sleep-disordered breathing, pulmonary function tests (impulse oscillometry), tuberculosis (directly observed therapy), and asthma. Experience in basic science research is available in laboratories associated with the division:
– molecular mechanisms of acute lung injury (Raj Wadgaonkar, PhD - DMC)
– cellular and molecular immunology: organ transplantation, haymaker gene in normal and malignant cells (Allen Norin, PhD - DMC)
– pulmonary endothelial cell biology (Michael Cutaia, MD - BVAMC)

Additional research opportunities are available through other clinical and basic science departments in the medical school.