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SUNY Downstate Medical Center

SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

Public Health for a Global Community

Master of Public Health

  • Academic Requirements
  • Course Descriptions

Master of Public Health Academic Requirements

Academic Requirements

The Master of Public Health Program (MPH) is currently offered as a part-time or full time program.

An MPH degree candidate must complete the proposed School of Public Health core requirements as well as the Concentration requirements. The number of credits required for successful completion of the program is 42.

All students must complete a Culminating Experience that integrates theory and practice. The SUNY Downstate Medical Center School of Public Health is well situated to offer potential students a broad range of Culminating Experiences through collaborative arrangements with an array of public and private hospitals, community-based organizations, and local, state, and federal agencies.


MPH Core Requirements

All students for an MPH must complete fifteen (15) credits of core course requirements, which provide the basic knowledge in major areas of public health. In addition to 15 core course credits, all MPH students are required to complete twelve (12) credits of concentration course requirements in their major area, twelve (12) credits of course electives, a one (1) credit field experience, and two (2) credits of the Culminating Experience.

Requirements
Course Number Course Title Credits
BIOS 5200 Principles of Biostatistics 3
CHSC 5200 Health Behavior and Risk Reduction 3
EOHS 5200 Issues in Environmental Health 3
EPID 5200 Principles of Epidemiology 3
HPMG 5206 Introduction to Health Policy and Management 3
Total
15

Concentration Options:

  1. Biostatistics
  2. Community Health Sciences - Urban And Immigrant Health
  3. Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences
  4. Epidemiology
  5. Health Policy And Management

MPH Degree with Concentrations in:

Biostatistics

The primary objective of the MPH in Biostatistics is to provide a strong foundation in Public Health with a focus on quantitative methods. Students choosing this Concentration should have a strong aptitude for quantitative reasoning and methods with a focus on public health.

Concentration Objectives
  • Apply basic probability theory and statistical methods to public health, biomedical and clinical research questions.
  • Design experimental and observational studies in public health, biomedical and clinical research.
  • Use statistical computer packages to organize and analyze data and report results.
  • Present the results of statistical analyses in both written and oral form to scientific and the lay audiences.
  • Review and critique statistical methods and interpretations presented in published research studies, presentations and reports.
  • Determine and identify the necessary data and data structures that are best suited to address public health issues, program planning and program evaluation.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of ethical issues related to the issues of biostatistics in public health.

Biostatistics Concentration Core Requirements
All students enrolled in the Biostatistics Concentration must complete the Concentration core requirements listed below.

Course Number Course Title Credits Pre-requisite Courses
BIOS 5201 Categorical Data Analysis 3 BIOS 5200, EPID 5200
BIOS 5202 Applied Regression Analysis 3 BIOS 5200, EPID 5200, BIOS 5201
BIOS 5203 Survival Analysis 3 BIOS 5200, EPID 5200, BIOS 5204
BIOS 5204 Statistical Computing 3 BIOS 5200, EPID 5200
Total
12

Biostatistics Concentration Electives

Students can choose 4 elective courses from the list below. Students may also opt to choose courses from other departments to satisfy the elective requirements. 

Course Number Course Title Credits Pre-requisite Courses
BIOS 5300 Introduction to Sampling 3 BIOS 5200, EPID 5200
BIOS 5301 Survey Research Methods 3 BIOS 5200, EPID 5200, BIOS 5201, BIOS 5204, EPID 5201
BIOS 5302 Advanced Experimental Design 3 BIOS 5200, EPID 5200, BIOS 5201, BIOS 5202, BIOS 5204, EPID 5201
BIOS 5303 Nonparametric Statistics 3 BIOS 5200, EPID 5200, BIOS 5201, BIOS 5202, BIOS 5204, EPID 5201
BIOS 5304 Design and Analysis of Clinical Trials 3 BIOS 5200
BIOS 5310 Independent Study 1-3

Community Health Sciences - Urban and Immigrant Health

This program provides students with the knowledge and skills needed to identify major behavioral, social, and cultural factors that impact the health of resident and immigrant individuals, their families, and their communities in urban settings. Students will work collaboratively on developing goals and strategies for modifying those factors, and on designing assessments to determine the effect of these efforts. A focus of training involves gaining an understanding of and skills needed to address issues that disproportionately impact urban and immigrant populations. Course and fieldwork target theory and methods for designing, implementing, and evaluating programs aimed at reducing the burden of major health problems.

Concentration Objectives
  • Identify individual, biological, social, community, organizational, and policy-level determinants of public health problems;
  • Determine major diseases, disorders, and conditions, and health disparities among urban and immigrant populations;
  • Describe the processes involved in identifying public health priorities in a community and collaborating effectively to prioritize goals and objectives;
  • Employ methods to integrate culturally competent approaches into public health practice;
  • Understand major methods and designs for evaluating public health interventions;
  • Effectively communicate verbally and in writing issues as they relate to the practice of public health behavioral and social interventions.

Community Health Sciences - Urban and Immigrant Health Concentration Core Requirements

All students enrolled in the Urban and Immigrant Health Concentration must complete the Concentration core requirements listed below.

Course Number Course Title Credits Pre-requisite Courses
CHSC 5202 Issues in the Health of Immigrant Populations 3  
CHSC 5203 Sex, Gender, Race, and Ethnicity 3  
CHSC 5205 Urban Health Issues 3  
CHSC 5206 Planning, Program, and Evaluation 3 CHSC 5200
Total
12
 

Community Health Sciences - Urban and Immigrant Health Concentration Electives

Students can choose 4 elective courses from the list below. Students may also opt to choose courses from other departments to satisfy the elective requirements. 

 

Course Number Course Title Credits Pre-requisite Courses
PUBH 5200 Introduction to Public Health 3
CHSC 5204 Community Organization 3
CHSC 5300 Introduction to Research 3 BIOS 5200, EPID 5200
CHSC 5301 Human Sexual Behavior 3
CHSC 5302 Social Marketing 3
CHSC 5303 Issues in HIV Prevention 3
CHSC 5304 Planning Pediatric & Adolescent Intervention 3
CHSC 5305 Issues in Adolescent Health 3
CHSC 5306 Psychosocial and Behavioral Epidemiology 3 BIOS 5200, EPID 5200, CHSC 5200
CHSC 5307 Early Child Development: A Public Health Perspective 3
CHSC 5308 Public Health Preparedness and Response to Emergencies 3 CHSC 5200
CHSC 5309 Introduction to Global Public Health 3
CHSC 5310 Independent Study 1-3
CHSC 5311 Public Health Practice 3
CHSC 5312 Reading Seminar on the Social Determinants of Health 3
CHSC 6020 Field Experience in Maternal and Child Health 1-3

Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences

Environmental health science is concerned with the study of the adverse impacts of physical, chemical, and biological agents in the environment on human health. To characterize the interface between human health and the environment, it is necessary to utilize a set of tools and methods to quantify or categorize exposure. The goal of the Environmental Health Concentration of the MPH at SUNY Downstate is to introduce students to the basic tools and competencies to identify, assess, and manage environmental health problems.

Concentration Objectives
  • Characterize the direct and indirect human, ecological and safety effects of major environmental and occupational agents.
  • Describe genetic, physiologic and psychosocial factors that affect susceptibility to adverse health outcomes following exposure to environmental hazards.
  • Describe federal and state regulatory programs, guidelines and authorities that control environmental health issues.
  • Specify current environmental risk assessment methods.
  • Identify the tools for assessment, prevention, and control of environmental hazards that threaten human health and safety.
  • Explain the general mechanisms of toxicity in eliciting a toxic response to various environmental exposures. Discuss the general mechanisms of toxicity and toxic response to foreign chemicals in the body.
  • Discuss various risk management and risk communication approaches in relation to issues of environmental justice and equity. Demonstrate knowledge of ethical issues related to problem solving in the environmental health sciences.
  • Develop a testable model of environmental insult.

Environmental & Occupational Health Concentration Core Requirements
All students enrolled in the Environmental & Occupational Health Concentration must complete the Concentration core requirements listed below.

Course Number Course Title Credits
EOHS 5201 Introduction to Management, Policy and Law 3
EOHS 5202 Occupational Health 3
EOHS 5203 Built Environment & Public Health 3
EOHS 5205 Public Health Aspects of Physical Trauma 3
Total
12

Environmental & Occupational Health Concentration Electives

Students can choose 4 elective courses from the list below. Students may also opt to choose courses from other departments to satisfy the elective requirements. 

Course Number Course Title Credits Pre-requisite Courses
EOHS 5302 Women's Health Policy: Epidemiology & the Environment 3 EOHS 5200
EOHS 5304 Case Studies in Environmental Health 3 EOHS 5200
EOHS 5306 Risk Assessment and Communication 3 EOHS 5200
EOHS 5307 Occupational & Environmental Epidemiology 3 EOHS 5200, BIOS 5200, EPID 5200
EOHS 5308 Environmental and Occupational Toxicology 3
EOHS 5309 Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis 3
EOHS 5310 Independent Study 1-3
EOHS 5311 Geographic Information Systems for Global Health 3

Epidemiology

This program will provide students with the knowledge and skills needed t o carry out epidemiologic investigations of major public health issues affecting urban and immigrant populations. Didactic training and fieldwork emphasizes skill in the planning and implementation of epidemiologic study designs; the collection and analysis of data; the interpretation and presentation of findings and discussion of public health implications.

Concentration Objectives
  • Identify types and sources of data used in epidemiologic research.
  • Describe trends and patterns of disease incidence, prevalence, burden of major diseases (both new and emerging) and factors affecting health status of immigrant and urban populations, and indicate major etiologic and prognostic factors for the same.
  • Interpret results of an epidemiologic study, including the relation to findings from other epidemiologic studies, limitations of the study and public health implications.
  • Understand the strengths and weaknesses of major methodological and analytical techniques used in epidemiology;
  • Appreciate the policy implications of epidemiologic research.
  • Develop testable hypotheses and set out relevant research questions and design and develop a feasible research proposal.
  • Exhibit practical skills, including subject selection, data collection, study logistics, construct a data set and analyze it using existing statistical software.
  • Prepare a paper for presentation or publication.
  • Communicate epidemiologic findings to lay and professional audiences.

Epidemiology Concentration Core Requirements

All students enrolled in the Epidemiology Concentration must complete the Concentration core requirements listed below.

Course Number Course Title Credits Pre-requisite Courses
EPID 5201 Epidemiologic Research Methods 3 BIOS 5200, EPID 5200
EPID 5202 Infectious Disease Epidemiology 3 EPID 5200
EPID 5203 Chronic Disease Epidemiology 3 BIOS 5200, EPID 5200
EPID 5205 Epidemiologic Research Methods II 3 BIOS 5200, EPID 5200, EPID 5201
Total
12

Epidemiology Concentration Electives

Students can choose 4 elective courses from the list below. Students may also opt to choose courses from other departments to satisfy the elective requirements. 

 

Course Number Course Title Credits Pre-requisite Courses
EPID 5300 Cancer Epidemiology 3 BIOS 5200, EPID 5200
EPID 5301 Reproductive Epidemiology 3 BIOS 5200, EPID 5200
EPID 5302 Epidemiology of HIV/AIDS 3 BIOS 5200, EPID 5200
EPID 5303 Nutritional Epidemiology 3 BIOS 5200, EPID 5200
EPID 5305 Epidemiology of Aging 3 BIOS 5200, EPID 5200
EPID 5307 Critical Approaches to the Epidemiologic Literature 3 BIOS 5200, EPID 5200, EPID 5201, EPID 5205
EPID 5308 Reproductive and Perinatal Epidemiology 3 BIOS 5200, EPID 5200
EPID 5310 Independent Study 1-3
EPID 5311 The Epidemiology of Emerging Infectious Diseases 3 EPID 5200, EPID 5202

Health Policy and Management

The goal of this Concentration is to prepare students to be leaders in the area of health policy and management. The over $2 billion spent on health care in the United States requires serious and competent stewardship. It is imperative that those who will be managers of health institutions and organizations and those who will develop and implement policy changes understand how the system came to be; how it currently operates and functions; and the likely scenarios for change in the future and their implications. This Concentration seeks to produce individuals within the field of public health who can provide leadership in health care organizations and institutions; and who can plan and evaluate management and policy strategies for health organizations and institutions.

Concentration Objectives
  • To understand how the health care system in the United States is organized, financed, and managed.
  • To understand how the health care system in the United States differs from those in other countries both advanced and developing and to understand the burden of health care.
  • To understand the different roles and functions of the various elements of the health care system in the U.S. including the public health system, the acute care system, the long term care system, and the mental health system.; and to understand the points of convergence and difference between these systems.
  • To grasp the historical and political development of health and health care in the United States to prepare students for changes that might occur in the future.
  • To understand and effectively communicate health management strategies and health policy approaches to important constituencies such as staff, government leaders, legislators, trustees and directors, media sources and the larger health policy and management community.

Health Policy and Management Concentration Core Requirements

All students enrolled in the Health Policy and Management Concentration must complete the Concentration core requirements listed below.

Course Number Course Title Credits
HPMG 5202 Health Care Advocacy and Politics 3
HPMG 5203 Health Management Concepts 3
HPMG 5204 Access, Cost and Quality of Care 3
HPMG 5207 Principles in Hospital Management 3
Total
12

Health Policy and Management Concentration Electives

Students can choose 4 elective courses from the list below. Students may also opt to choose courses from other departments to satisfy the elective requirements. 

 

Course Number Course Title Credits Pre-requisite Courses
HPMG 5201 Health Policy in the Delivery System 3 HPMG 5206
HPMG 5306

Policy Studies in urban and immigrant health

3  
HPMG 5307 Global Issues in Maternal and Child Health Policy 3  
HPMG 5308 Public Health Law and Bioethics 3  
HPMG 5309 Policy Issues in Mental Illness 3  
HPMG 5310 Independent Study 1-3  

Field Experience:

Course Number Course Title Credits
PUBH 6500 Field Experience 1

PUBH 6500: Field Experience 1 credit

This course is an opportunity for students to apply the knowledge and skills learned in the classroom directly in a fieldwork experience. After completion of an online module on professionalism, the student will work at an approved external site, typically a local or state health agency or a local organization under the supervision of a public health professional. If a student is able to do a placement only in his or her regular place of employment, the assignment must extend beyond or be something other than his or her regular work duties and allow application of knowledge and skills learned in the classroom.

Culminating Experience:

The Culminating Experience allows the student to demonstrate the ability to integrate knowledge and skills in a Final Project similar to some aspect of practice as a public health professional. The faculty uses the Culminating Experience to judge whether the student demonstrates proficiency in the competencies required for public health practice.

All MPH students must complete a Culminating Experience within their chosen program of study.

Details

Culminating Experience 2 credits

Course Number Course Title Credits Pre-requisite Courses
BIOS 6001 Culminating Experience in Biostatistics 2 All Core and BIOS Concentration Courses
CHSC 6001 Culminating Experience in Community Health Sciences 2 All Core and CHSC Concentration Courses
EOHS 6001 Culminating Experience in Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences 2 All Core and EOHS Concentration Courses
EPID 6001 Culminating Experience in Epidemiology 2 All Core and EPID Concentration Courses
HPMG 6001 Culminating Experience in Health Policy and Management 2 All Core and HPMG Concentration Courses

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Master of Public Health Course Descriptions

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MPH Core Requirements

All students for an MPH must complete fifteen (15) credits of core requirements, which provide the basic knowledge in major areas of public health. In addition to 15 core credits, all MPH students are required to complete a one (1) credit field experience, two (2) credits of the Culminating Experience, and twelve (12) credits of electives.



Required MPH Core Courses (15 credits)
BIOS 5200: Principles of Biostatistics (3)

Introduction to statistical methods in public health. The course will cover descriptive statistics, probability concepts, and estimation of parameters, hypothesis testing, simple linear regression, correlation, and analysis of attribute data.

CHSC 5200: Health Behavior and Risk Reduction (3)

An introduction to the concepts, theories, and status of research in health promotion and disease prevention, with an emphasis on methods employed to modify group and individual health-related behaviors. This course examines methods of ascertaining health behaviors, the design and interpretation of behavioral intervention programs to modify behaviors, and current trends in the study of how lifestyle and preventive health practices impact on public health.

EOHS 5200: Issues in Environmental Health (3)

Major environmental health issues. The course addresses public health issues in the management of water quality, wastewater, occupational health, trace elements, municipal and hazardous waste, vector control and air quality.

EPID 5200: Principles of Epidemiology (3)

This course offers an introduction to the principles, concepts, and methods of epidemiologic research. Topics include the calculation, interpretation and application of measures of disease frequency, association and public health impact; epidemiologic study design and analysis (including the role of chance, bias and confounding); direct standardization of rates, statistical inference and principles of screening. This course also teaches students how to apply epidemiologic methods to critically analyze and interpret public health literature.

HPMG 5206: Introduction to Health Policy and Management (3)

This course uses a multi-disciplinary approach to policy and management in both the healthcare and the public health systems. Students will learn the organization, financing, and delivery of services within these systems as well as their legal and ethical bases. Students will also develop skills in program planning, development, budgeting, and evaluation; in strategic planning; in ensuring community health safety and preparedness; and in quality improvement initiatives. A central theme of the course is the accessibility and outcomes of care for urban and immigrant populations.


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Biostatistics Concentration Core Requirements (12 credits)
BIOS 5201: Categorical Data Analysis (3)

This course covers analytical techniques involved in the analysis of studies where subjects have been cross-classified by two or more categorical variables. Special emphasis will be on problems related to epidemiology, public health and medicine. Topics will include: significance versus magnitude of association; estimation of relative risk; matching cases and controls; effects, measurement, and control of misclassification errors; combining evidence from many studies; and logistic regression. Students will be introduced to the SPSS statistical package for the topics covered in the course.
Prerequisite: BIOS 5200, EPID 5200.

BIOS 5202: Applied Regression Analysis (3)

This course emphasizes the concepts and applications of building and evaluating regression models for public health studies. It covers simple and multiple linear regression models, including polynomial regression and analysis of variance (ANOVA) and co-variance (ANCOVA) for design of experiments as special cases. Binary regression including logistic regression and application to case-control studies will be discussed. In addition, loglinear models for count data will be covered.
Prerequisites: BIOS 5200, EPID 5200, BIOS 5201.

BIOS 5203: Survival Analysis (3)

This course covers the basic theoretical aspects and applications of various models to analyze "time to event" data. Basic concepts such as the survival function, hazard function, left and right hand censoring, and common parametric models for analyzing survival data will be covered. The proportional hazards (PH) model with fixed and time dependent covariates, the stratified PH model, regression diagnostics for survival models, additive hazards regression models and multivariate survival models will also be covered.
Prerequisites: BIOS 5200, EPID 5200, BIOS 5204.

BIOS 5204: Statistical Computing (3)

This course will give students a working knowledge of two statistical analysis software packages, SAS and SPSS. Emphasis will be placed on the basics of data management of files, data manipulation, basic data display, graphical display of data and statistical analysis. Although the Windows environment will be discussed, emphasis will be placed on the writing of program code.
Prerequisites: BIOS 5200, EPID 5200.


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Biostatistics Concentration Elective Courses (12 credits)

Students can choose 4 elective courses from the list below. Students may also opt to choose courses from other departments to satisfy the elective requirements. 

BIOS 5300: Introduction to Sampling (3)

This course presents practical sampling methods and their theoretical background. It covers simple random, stratified, systematic, and simple stage cluster sampling techniques. In addition, ratio, regression, and difference estimation will be covered. An emphasis will be placed on sampling human populations in large communities.
Prerequisites: BIOS 5200, EPID 5200.

BIOS 5301: Survey Research Methods (3)

This course provides an introduction to the design, analysis, and interpretation of sample surveys. Types of sampling covered will include simple random sampling, stratified random sampling, systematic sampling, cluster sampling, and multi-stage sampling. Methods of estimation are described to estimate means, totals, ratios, and proportions. Development of sampling designs combining a variety of types of sampling and methods of estimation, and detailed description of sample size determinations to achieve goals of desired precision at least cost will be covered.
Prerequisites: BIOS 5200, EPID 5200, BIOS 5201, BIOS 5204, EPID 5201.

BIOS 5302: Advanced Experimental Design (3)

This intermediate course covers a broad perspective of experimental designs covered in public health, including various ANOVA designs, case-cohort studies, case-crossover studies, cross sectional studies, prospective and retrospective cohort studies, randomized clinical trials and meta analysis. The advantage and disadvantages of the various studies are discussed and emphasis is placed on selection of the appropriate study, sample size estimation and controlling for sources of bias and reduction of variability.
Prerequisites: BIOS 5200, EPID 5200, BIOS 5201, BIOS 5202, BIOS 5204, EPID 5201.

BIOS 5303: Nonparametric Statistics (3)

This course covers a survey of topics related to distribution-free approaches to statistical inference. Topics will include: Fisher's method of randomization; distribution free test procedures for means, variances, correlations, and trends; and rank tests. Relative efficiency, asymptotic relative efficiency and normal-score procedures will be covered. Binomial and hypergeometric distributions are covered to develop a variety of test and interval estimation procedures.
Prerequisites: BIOS 5200, EPID 5200, BIOS 5201, BIOS 5202, BIOS 5204, EPID 5201.

BIOS 5304: Design and Analysis of Clinical Trials (3)

This course covers fundamental concepts in the design and conduct of modern clinical trials. Topics include: sample size and power, reliability of measurement, the parallel-groups design, factorial designs, blocking, stratification, analysis of covariance, the crossover study, latin squares.
Prerequisites: BIOS 5200.

BIOS 5310: Independent Study (1-3)

Independent study courses focus on a particular issue or set of issues related to a particular topic in public health. An Independent Study Program consists of assignments, research papers, clinical experiences and presentations submitted for academic credit. The student works closely with the professor(s) to determine the study focus and requirements.


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Community Health Sciences (Urban & Immigrant Health) Concentration Core Courses (12 credits)
CHSC 5202: Issues in the Health of Immigrant Populations (3)

Emigration from another country can have important effects on the health of the émigré. The demographic, scientific, clinical, economic, social, political, ethical, and legal factors of the country of origin interact with those of the new country. They are manifest in different ways in the health of immigrants – new and old. This course will consider these and other related public health issues across the lifespan.

CHSC 5203: Sex, Gender, Race, and Ethnicity in Health (3)

The health and well being of human beings have been under intense scrutiny and involved important changes during the 20th century. Gender and racial/ethnic inequities are being addressed and gaps in knowledge narrowing. These changes involve multiple factors. This course considers many of those factors as they interact with demographic, scientific, clinical, economic, social, political, ethical, and legal issues.

CHSC 5205: Urban Health Issues (3)

The goal of this course is to prepare public health professionals to analyze and intervene in urban health issues. The course explores the health of urban populations around the world, with a special focus on New York City, from historical, economic, social, spatial, and medical perspectives. Key concepts include social capital, social cohesion, social hierarchies, social networks, public health infrastructure, healthy neighborhoods, health disparities, globalization, and micro-geographic analysis. Each semester the class will explore three health topics in depth and will organize a neighborhood mini-conference on one of these topics in collaboration with local stakeholders. In addition, each student will perform weekly analyses of his/her neighborhood of residence and periodic analyses of the neighborhood surrounding SUNY-Downstate.

CHSC 5206: Program, Planning, and Evaluation (3)

Community-based programs that are designed to change health-related behaviors comprise the vast majority of the public health efforts to reduce the morbidity and mortality in populations. This course covers the life stage of community-based programs from inception, implementation, and sustainability. The course applies the theoretical concepts from the social and behavioral sciences, health education, and health communication to the planning, design, and evaluation of community-based interventions. A program-planning framework provides the methodology to examine social and behavioral determinants of health and to identify appropriate intervention and evaluation design. Characteristics of theory-based interventions are discussed, critiqued, and assessed for relevance to the needs of the students who will have the opportunity to apply these ideas to their own work.
Prerequisites: CHSC 5200.


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Community Health Sciences (Urban & Immigrant Health) Concentration Elective Courses (12 credits)

Students can choose 4 elective courses from the list below. Students may also opt to choose courses from other departments to satisfy the elective requirements. 

PUBH 5200: Introduction to Public Health (3)

Introduction to the broad concepts of public health practice including the mission, core functions, structure, policy role, program activities, and collaborative endeavors of public health agencies. Theoretical and practical perspectives are studied to illustrate contemporary strategies for health promotion and disease prevention at local, state, and national levels.

CHSC 5204: Community Organization (3)

Emphasis on community organizations as a major interventional approach to community dynamics, social change, and community participation in addressing health problems. The course explores methods for identifying and analyzing community health problems and their causes.

CHSC 5300: Introduction to Research (3)

Basics for participating in the development, implementation, and evaluation of research studies in public health, particularly health-care delivery. Each student will be expected to develop and present a research proposal.
Prerequisites: BIOS 5200, EPID 520.

CHSC 5301: Human Sexual Behavior (3)

Focus on aspects of human sexual behavior from a psychosocial and behavioral perspective. A brief review of human anatomy and physiology as well as developmental abnormalities will be considered. The purpose is to educate health professionals about the strong influences of sexuality in all its facets.

CHSC 5302: Social Marketing (3)

Social marketing is a key ingredient in strategies to develop, implement, and evaluate health communication and education programs. This course will focus on developing and presenting a social marketing plan addressing a specific public health issue among a specific racial or ethnic group.

CHSC 5303: Issues in HIV Prevention (3)

Different facets of HIV prevention including the risk factors and the impact of social, economic, racial/ethnic, cultural, and religious factors on the development of the disease. Studies focusing on different communities at high risk for the disease will be studied.

CHSC 5304: Planning Pediatric Interventions (3)

This course will require systems thinking in terms of how individuals, social networks, communities and organizations interact and affect the public health on a local, state, national and international level. This course will challenge you to identify the specific pediatric health issues affecting a local community, prioritize them, outline interventions and describe evaluation techniques for assessing the effectiveness of the interventions. The course will be interactive and encourages discussion of unique and diverse approaches to both new and long-standing problems affecting the pediatric population in this area. This course will focus on practical application and real-life scenarios. Although pediatric health issues will be the focus, the principles learned should be applicable to health concerns of other populations.

CHSC 5305: Issues in Adolescent Health (3)

The myriad factors that influence adolescent development are considered juxtaposed against societal and public health issues. This course provides the student with an opportunity to enhance knowledge regarding this period of human development.

CHSC 5306: Understanding Health Behavior): Psychosocial and Behavioral Epidemiology (3)

This course provides an introduction to the social, psychological, and behavioral issues that influence patterns of health and health care delivery. The focus is on the integration of the biomedical, social, psychological, and behavioral factors that must be taken into consideration when public health initiatives are developed and implemented. The course is based on ecological theories of influences on health behavior. The course also includes the application of epidemiologic methods to the study of social, psychological, and behavioral influences on health, disease, and recovery/mortality.
Prerequisites: BIOS 5200, EPID 5200, CHSC 5200.

CHSC 5307: Early Child Development: A Public Health Perspective (3)

This course introduces students to early child development, the conditions which shape it, and how developmental and learning problems arising in early childhood (here collectively termed “developmental disorders” - DD) are identified and addressed at an individual and a population level.

The focus of the course will be on preventive and treatment interventions for DD's based in the home, community programs, and health care settings in the United States and internationally. Through field visits and presentations, the students will become familiar with how such interventions are conducted, and the role of different stakeholders (families, public health programs, NGO's, health care providers, school systems) in planning, funding, running and evaluating them. During the course, students will gain experience in doing basic developmental screenings, assessing the home caregiving environment, planning interventions and preparing and presenting messages about early child development for families.

CHSC 5308: Public Health Preparedness and Response to Emergencies (3)

This course investigates the role of public health professionals in planning and responding to "all hazards" emergencies that stress the public health and healthcare system. Topics will include:public health law; federal funding programs forpreparedness and response; incident management system;training and exercises development;chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive events; hazard vulnerability analysis;and the psychosocial impact of disasters. The course will be problem based and explore current topics such asH1N1,structural collapses, coastal storms, etc. A part of the course will also focus onrecovery and long term impacts (psychosocial, environmental,health effects, etc.). Students will useactual emergency management planning tools and templates from the federal government, supporting agencies and NYC, as well asjournal articles.
Prerequisites: CHSC 5200.

CHSC 5309: Introduction to Global Public Health (3)

Introduction to Global Public Health through discussion of global public health issues in different geo-political settings, of health dynamics and their impact on global health, and the role of public health in implementing interventions.

Students will realize the basic principals of Global Public Health through their direct application to three different country scenarios: 1. Earthquake response, 2. Refugee crisis, and 3. Non-crisis foreign healthcare system.

At the completion of the course students will show a basic understanding of global health terminology, critical global health issues, global health care disparities, important global public health stakeholders, and the role of public health in the global context.

CHSC 5310: Independent Study (3)

Independent study courses focus on a particular issue or set of issues related to a particular topic in public health. An Independent Study Program consists of assignments, research papers, clinical experiences and presentations submitted for academic credit. The student works closely with the professor(s) to determine the study focus and requirements.

CHSC 5311: Public Health Practice (3)

This course will provide students with an in-depth understanding of the scope of the public health field and a practical foundation for future career opportunities. Students will become familiar with the evolution of public health as a field, including past achievements as well as current issues and future directions. The course will emphasize the core functions of public health and describe how these functions relate to communities, the role of government, public health agencies and professionals. This course will feature presentations from experts in the field when appropriate.

CHSC 5312: Reading Seminar on the Social Determinants of Health (3)

The social, economic, political, and physical conditions in which we live have an enormous impact on public health.  These conditions, which are called the social determinants of health, include distribution of power and resources within and across populations, and account for enormous health disparities domestically and globally.  In this course, we will engage in an in-depth exploration of the social determinants of health through the critical reading and analysis of books that focus on one or more of these determinants, and will discuss how public health efforts can be leveraged to improve those social conditions that impact health and quality of life.

 

CHSC 6020: Field Experience in Maternal and Child Health (1-3)

The overall goal of the course is to give the student experience in applying maternal and child health knowledge and skills in an off-campus public health setting. The experience is a planned, supervised, and evaluated internship that takes place in one of a variety of agencies or organizations, including community-based organizations and governmental departments.


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Environmental And Occupational Health Sciences Required Concentration Core Courses (12 credits)
EOHS 5201: Introduction to Management, Policy and Law (3)

An overview of the history and current application of laws and rules used to protect the environment. This course is oriented towards United States federal legislation, as well as examples from New York State law. The evolution of specific acts including Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Clean Air Act (CAA) and Clean Water Act (CWA), the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) will be covered. International environmental health laws, including Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH), the European toxic substances control initiative, will be included. Emphasis will be placed on viewing environmental and occupational health law from an environmental justice perspective and examining the role of equity in environmental planning, policy-making, decision-making and in the distribution of environmental burdens and benefits.

EOHS 5202: Occupational Health (3)

Surveys the history of occupational health, the continuum from exposure to disease, the hierarchy of controls in the workplace, occupational health hazards, legal and regulatory issues, provision of occupational health services, and methods in comprehensive workplace health improvement.

EOHS 5203: Built Environment & Public Health (3)

Explores basic concepts of toxicology as applied to environmental toxicants including the distribution, metabolism, and elimination of environmental chemicals in the body. Examines the application of these concepts to the understanding of disease processes resulting from adverse environmental exposures.

EOHS 5205: Public Health Aspects of Physical Trauma (3)

Examination of injury and violence as seen in urban settings. The course is designed to incorporate models into practical application in communities using case examples.

Environmental And Occupational Health Sciences Concentration Electives (12 credits)

Students can choose 4 elective courses from the list below. Students may also opt to choose courses from other departments to satisfy the elective requirements. 

EOHS 5302: Women's Health Policy: Epidemiology and the Environment (3)

This course will identify key indicators of women's health and women's health needs utilizing both environmental health sciences and health policy perspectives. Current and historical examples will highlight how health. Needs, medical practice and policies have evolved over time.
Prerequisites: EOHS 5200.

EOHS 5304: Case Studies in Environmental Health (3)

In this course students will review a series of case studies that illustrate core concepts of environmental health science including hazard identification, toxicology, exposure assessment, epidemiology, and risk assessment, communication and policy.
Prerequisites: EOHS 5200.

EOHS 5306: Risk Assessment and Communication (3)

Examines the core foundations of risk assessment, including hazard identification, dose response, exposure assessment and risk characterization. Introduces the basic concepts in risk management and risk communication. Provides an understanding of how risk assessment serves as an interface between science and policy.
Prerequisites: EOHS 5200.

EOHS 5307: Occupational & Environmental Epidemiology (3)

This course provides an overview of current topics and controversies in occupational and environmental epidemiology. It will provide the student with familiarity with research techniques in this area, and capacity to evaluate current research relevant to public health practice and policy. The course is structured as a seminar, with discussion of research topics and techniques based upon analysis of published papers in the field, both historical and current. Guidance will be provided and students will be expected to produce increasingly sophisticated critiques of research as the course progresses.
Prerequisites: EOHS 5200, BIOS 5200, EPID 5200.

EOHS 5308: Environmental and Occupational Toxicology (3)

This course introduces the basic concepts of toxicology and their extension to occupational and environmental settings, in order to understand the effects of chemical exposures on populations. Concepts discussed include toxicokinetics and metabolism, dose-response relationships, molecular, cellular and organ responses to toxic chemicals, principles of testing for toxic effects, and factors that increase susceptibility to toxic insult. The course will focus on chemicals and metals found in the workplace setting and the environment, including organic solvents, metals, and pesticides. The course assumes knowledge of college-level chemistry and biology. A background in college organic chemistry and either the introductory SPH Environmental Health or COM Pharmacology course are recommended, though not required.

EOHS 5309: Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (3)

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) provide a powerful tool for analyzing spatial patterns. Applications of spatial analysis are rapidly expanding to encompass diverse phenomena. For example, an epidemiologist might use spatial analysis tools to determine if there is clustering of infectious disease cases near a suspected source of the pathogen. An analyst at an urban public health department might use it to understand how fall injuries are distributed in a particular city and if there are specific environmental reasons for this clustering effect. This research seminar is meant to advance students knowledge of tools available for spatial analysis.

The course embeds learning quantitative research and spatial analysis methods in the context of developing and carrying out unique research questions and learning methods for answering those questions. Early in the semester students will begin to develop research questions that use advanced GIS techniques. In order to assist students with crafting their research questions methodology readings will be provided. While students develop their topics they will also be learning advanced techniques for spatial analysis. Advanced Spatial Analysis topics will include:

Spatial statistics and cluster analysis

Spatial interpolation

Constructing and analyzing networks using Network Analyst

Remote sensing health and environmental data

Basic scripting

The course provides a great opportunity to begin testing and developing Culminating Experience or thesis ideas and methods.

 

EOHS 5310: Independent Study (1-3)

Independent study courses focus on a particular issue or set of issues related to a particular topic in public health. An Independent Study Program consists of assignments, research papers, clinical experiences and presentations submitted for academic credit. The student works closely with the professor(s) to determine the study focus and requirements.

 

EOHS 5311: Geographic Information Systems for Global Health (3)

This course is an introduction to the concepts of Geographic Information Systems as they apply to public health. It is an intermediate level graduate course in the application of methods for displaying, describing and analyzing spatial environmental exposure and disease data and a doctoral level course for students in any field with an interest in the application of spatial methods to exposure data and disease data. Students in environmental health, epidemiology, and biostatistics are particularly encouraged to participate. Masters students with the appropriate background may enroll with the instructor's permission. The course will focus primarily on the spatial distribution of risk factors for disease outcomes, but the principles discussed can be broadly applied. All students must be thoroughly computer literate; know Excel and feel comfortable working in a multi-windowed environment.

Attendees will learn the general concepts of GIS, and the particular applications of this technology to public health. They will also acquire hands-on experience using GIS to create GIS layers, using GIS to perform queries and searches, and create maps and reports, including statistical reports. Additionally, students will learn how to properly capture, store and format data so that it can be used in GIS, as well as how to re-format existing data in order to create maps of the data.

 


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Epidemiology Concentration Required Core Courses (12 credits)
EPID 5201: Epidemiologic Research Methods (3)

This course introduces concepts of study design, data management and data analysis that are suitable for epidemiologic research. This course will enable students to design studies and write competitive proposals on contemporary issues in epidemiology and public health affecting immigrant and urban populations. Students will be provided with the practical skills necessary to plan and carry out research projects. Specifically, learners will explore principles and concepts associated with the design of sample surveys that are representative of populations and the analysis of data from such surveys. Throughout the course, students will be asked to prepare comprehensive, concise written reports for a variety of audiences.
Prerequisites: BIOS 5200, EPID 5200.

EPID 5202: Infectious Disease Epidemiology (3)

This course provides students with a multidisciplinary framework for understanding the principles of interventions against infectious diseases. The course also provides knowledge and understanding of disease agents in the context of their routes of transmission and examines the reasons for successes, partial successes and failures of interventions, taking into account the social, political and economic contexts in which health systems operate. Specific topics related to the epidemiology of communicable diseases include: basic concepts and methods; epidemiologic aspects of vaccination; surveillance and outbreak investigation and the control of communicable disease in countries with a developed public health infrastructure.
Prerequisites: EPID 5200.

EPID 5203: Chronic Disease Epidemiology (3)

This course explores the burden of chronic non-communicable diseases (CNCDs) in NY. Using a variety of sources of data (e.g. US Census data, NYS Cancer Registry and Community Health Survey) relevant to immigrant and urban populations in NY, this course will review the epidemiology of obesity, cardiovascular diseases (hypertension, stroke, coronary artery disease) and diabetes and cancer. This course also reviews the methodological issues in different types of study designs aimed at identifying the determinants of major CNCDs, and teaches students how plan successful preventive strategies.
Prerequisites: BIOS 5200, EPID 5200.

EPID 5205: Epidemiologic Research Methods II (3)

This course is the culmination of the principles of epidemiology methodology. It follows the introduction to epidemiologic concepts in EPID 5200 and the intermediate methods covered in EPID 5201. This course is comprised of two distinct sections. The first half focuses on concepts of causality, by examining both the philosophical underpinnings and the statistical and logical applications of associative inference. Major concepts given in-depth coverage include the following: the comparison of and contrast between measures of effect and measures of association; confounding, effect modification and bias, with an emphasis on the tools applied in their measurement and assessment; the purpose of randomization. The second half of the course focuses on the practical implementation of various modeling strategies to measure the association between an exposure and outcome while simultaneously addressing confounding, effect modification and biases. Outcomes commonly encountered in epidemiology will be explored, and therefore will demonstrate the application of linear, logistic and Poisson regression techniques. The use of propensity score models for unmeasured confounding will also be considered. The modeling mechanics of each technique will be taught, but always with an emphasis on each technique’s strengths and limitations and its overall relevance to causality and inference. Moreover, these specific regression techniques are located in a broader general approach to the analysis of an exposure-outcome association, which applies formal univariate and bivariate association techniques prior to the application of multivariable methods. As such, the student will obtain a thorough understanding of causal interpretation of exposure-outcome associations by developing a strict step-by-step approach to epidemiologic analyses.
Prerequisites: BIOS 5200, EPID 5200, EPID 5201.


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Epidemiology Required Elective Courses (12 credits)

Students can choose 4 elective courses from the list below. Students may also opt to choose courses from other departments to satisfy the elective requirements. 

EPID 5300: Cancer Epidemiology (3)

This course reviews principles and methods used in the investigation of cancer incidence and mortality. Basic concepts of cancer biology and the role of environmental determinants (e.g. tobacco, alcohol, radiation, chemicals, stress, and nutrition) and genetic susceptibility will be reviewed. Using data from the NYS Cancer Registry, we will examine the sociodemographic magnitude of cancer in Brooklyn, and discuss factors influencing cancer prevention and control efforts.
Prerequisites: BIOS 5200, EPID 5200.

EPID 5301: Reproductive Epidemiology (3)

This course explores the nature and determinants of ill-health in pregnant women and babies, and to demonstrate the contribution of epidemiologic methods to problem identification and to the design and evaluation of strategies to improve maternal and child health. Topics of discussion include disparities between various population groups, contraception, menstruation, fertility, abortion, menopause, and maternal morbidity and mortality. Discussion of contemporary issues in safe motherhood and perinatal health in developing countries will also be provided throughout the course.
Prerequisites: BIOS 5200, EPID 5200.

EPID 5302: Epidemiology of HIV/AIDS

This course represents a detailed model of how to tackle the epidemiological and public health aspects of a viral infection; it provides information on different routes of transmission, worldwide temporal changes in infection rate and persons at risk, historical interventions to control the diffusion of the infection along with their success rate. The course also provides knowledge and understanding of the infection versus the clinical manifestation of the disease.
Prerequisites: BIOS 5200, EPID 5200.

Specific topics include: epidemiologic aspects of new treatments of the infection, surveillance of infection and disease trends, prevention strategies, changes in laboratory methods for virus detection and diagnosis and their impact on disease surveillance.

EPID 5303: Nutritional Epidemiology (3)

This course applies epidemiologic methods and principles to current studies of diet, nutrition and chronic disease. Students will gain expertise in understanding the current state of knowledge on the relationship between nutrition and disease including the role of co-factors. Strengths and weaknesses of the methods available to assess exposure in nutritional epidemiologic studies will be presented as students will be asked to critically evaluate epidemiologic evidence on diet-disease relationships. Other topics to be covered include: evaluation of methods to prevent nutrition-related diseases through strategies aimed at promoting population based dietary change, identification, summarization and interpretation of a range of materials relevant to the specification of priority nutrition problems in a given population; discussion of the constraints involved in program implementation; presentation of a proposal for a nutrition intervention orally and in summary written form.
Prerequisites: BIOS 5200, EPID 5200.

EPID 5305: Epidemiology of Aging (3)

This course will prepare students to effectively study health characteristics of the rapidly increasing population of older adults in the United States. Some of the topics covered will include changes in national and international age and lifespan demographics; theories of aging; the limits of the human lifespan and life-extension efforts; the interrelation of aging, health, and the environment; measurement of survival, mortality, and cause of death; measurement of physical functioning and activities of daily living; age- and disease-related changes in cognitive functioning; depression in older adults; injury (falls, driving accidents); the influence of age on disease and how to account for the age effects in the study of disease; health, frailty, and “successful” aging. Students will examine methods for conducting epidemiological studies in older populations and the implications of an aging society on public health practice.
Prerequisites: BIOS 5200, EPID 5200.

EPID 5307: Critical Approaches to the Epidemiologic Literature

This course will develop a systematic approach to the critical appraisal of the epidemiologic literature. Students will be required to follow a standardized outline for the critical review of published scientific papers drawn from both chronic disease and infectious disease epidemiology. The objectives for this course are twofold. First, the students are to gain a rigorous technique for assessing the quality of the science behind the epidemiologic methods in published studies. Second, students are to apply nuanced critical thinking to scientific results in published studies.
Prerequisites: BIOS 5200, EPID 5200, EPID 5201, EPID 5205.

EPID 5308: Reproductive and Perinatal Epidemiology

Reproductive and perinatal epidemiology is a profoundly important aspect of public health. Both the reproductive and perinatal time periods set the pace not only for immediate birth outcomes, but also health over the life span. This reproductive and perinatal epidemiology course covers broad reproductive and perinatal health issues from thepre-conception, prenatal, delivery and post-natal periods and emphasizes health issues affecting both women and infants. Topics of discussion includedisparities between various population groups, male and female fertility, fetal growth, maternal and infant morbidity and mortality, study designs and causal inference.

Prerequisites: BIOS 5200, EPID 5200.

EPID 5310: Independent Study (1-3)

Independent study courses focus on a particular issue or set of issues related to a particular topic in public health. An Independent Study Program consists of assignments, research papers, clinical experiences and presentations submitted for academic credit. The student works closely with the professor(s) to determine the study focus and requirements.

 

EPID 5311: The Epidemiology of Emerging Infectious Diseases (3)

This course explores the landscapes of emerging infectious diseases in several varied geographies and ecologies. We first explore the biologic, ecologic, physical, and social concepts of emerging and re-emerging infections. We then identify and apply methodology relevant to the surveillance and investigation of such infections. Several case studies of emerging/re-emerging infectious diseases will be used to develop techniques for applied infectious disease epidemiology specific to the unique context of these emergent infections. Some examples may include dengue fever, Lyme disease, West Nile virus, pandemic influenza, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB), methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), hemorrhagic fevers, Henipavirus infections, and measles. All techniques are grounded in a landscape epidemiology approach to infectious disease, which recognizes spatial and ecologic parameters as critical to the etiologic understanding of these important diseases. The relationships between humans and the environment, humans and animals (both wild and domestic), and humans and humans, will be explored in both urban and rural contexts to identify critical epidemiologic features that can be exploited by pathogens to cause disease.

Prerequisites: EPID 5200, EPID 5202


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Health Policy And Management Concentration Required Core Courses (12 credits)
HPMG 5202: Health Care Advocacy and Politics (3)

This course will review basic legal and legislative processes at both state and federal levels. Students will learn how changes are made in the health system and ways of abetting change.

HPMG 5203: Health Management Concepts (3)

Basic concepts of management and organization behavior will be explored in this course. The role of management in complex organizations and the ways in which organizations change will be discussed. Students will learn how to relate to supervisors and staff and how to encourage optimal working conditions.

HPMG 5204: Access, Cost and Quality of Care (3)

This course will look in detail at the U.S. Health care system in terms of its major components, their interactions, and how to best effect positive change that will improve health and health care services for the population.

HPMG 5207: Principles in Hospital Management (3)

This course helps prepare a student for potential leadership positions in hospitals and other healthcare settings. It explores in depth a range of practical topics including governance, legal and ethical issues, risk management, quality management, accreditation, licensing, marketing, financial management, regulatory compliance, strategic planning, departmental roles and the migration of services to ambulatory settings. Case studies, team exercises, and interviews with organizational leaders form the framework of the course.

Health Policy And Management Concentration Elective Courses (12 credits)

Students can choose 4 elective courses from the list below. Students may also opt to choose courses from other departments to satisfy the elective requirements. 

HPMG 5201: Health Policy in the Delivery System (3)

This course focuses on the intersection between public health, policy, and politics. It provides an orientation to health policy, politics, and the policy in the U.S.
Prerequisite: HPMG 5206.

HPMG 5306: Policy Studies in Urban and  Immigrant Health (3)

This course will explore from a public health perspective the range of policies that affect specific vulnerable groups.   This approach exemplifies a core aspect of Principles of the Ethical Practice of Public Health:

Public health should advocate and work for the empowerment of disenfranchised community members, aiming to ensure that the basic resources and conditions necessary for health are accessible to all. 

Part of this hybrid course will take place asynchronously on-line.   Each semester it will focus on three or four groups, which may vary over time.  Examples may include injured veterans, undocumented immigrants, youth gangs, refugees, sex workers, or persons with chronic mental illness.  A multidisciplinary faculty will explore with students the relevant policy issues and the potential public health responses.  Students will complete a service-learning project in collaboration with members of one of the groups studied.

No prerequisite.  Open to non-matriculated students with instructor's approval.

HPMG 5307: Global Issues in Maternal and Child Health Policy (3)

This course helps prepare the student for a public health career to improve maternal and child health globally or locally.  Part of this hybrid course will take place asynchronously on-line.  Case studies from around the world will be the basis for critical analysis of current policies and of the evidence base for successful interventions.   Typical issues for study include maternal mortality, contraception, safe abortion, female genital cutting, child survival, stillbirths, refugee populations, birth outcomes among immigrants to the US, sex trafficking, and toxic environmental exposures to women and children.  All students will participate in a service-learning project related to the course content.

No prerequisite.  Open to non-matriculated students with instructor's approval.

HPMG 5308: Public Health Law and Bioethics (3)

This course explores the basic tenets of bioethics along with basic principles of laws pertaining to public health. Practical applications of these foundational principles will be explored and demonstrated using actual cases, real-life scenarios requiring critical thinking and other assignments which call upon a student’s ability to balance established rules and accepted practices with their personal opinions. Throughout the course distinctions will be made between health law and public health law and the relevance to various professional practices will be delineated. Contemporary challenges in health care and public health delivery, especially in urban settings that address immigrant issues, will be emphasized. The students will emerge from the course with a better understanding of the legal milieu in which we must function. Students also will be better prepared to enter public health-related practice with a basic understanding of bioethical principles relevant to contemporary challenges in public health and health care practice.
No prerequisite. Open to non-matriculated students with instructor's approval.

HPMG 5309: Policy Issues in Mental Illness (3)

This entirely on-line and asynchronous course over a semester prepares the student to participate as a public health professional in analysis and advocacy for effective public health policies on the major mental illnesses globally:  schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression.  The course emphasizes current scientific understanding of these disorders within a social-ecological framework.  The class analyzes past and current federal and state laws on treatment, income support, and criminal justice involving the mentally ill in terms of effectiveness and social justice.  A special focus of the class is policy implications for urban and immigrant populations.  The class also compares U.S. practices with emerging global health models of best practices.

HPMG 5310: Independent Study (1-3)

Independent study courses focus on a particular issue or set of issues related to a particular topic in public health. An Independent Study Program consists of assignments, research papers, clinical experiences and presentations submitted for academic credit. The student works closely with the professor(s) to determine the study focus and requirements.


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Field And Culminating Experience

All MPH students must complete a Field Experience and a Culminating Experience.

PUBH 6500: Field Experience (1)

This course is an opportunity for students to apply the knowledge and skills learned in the classroom directly in a fieldwork experience. After completion of an online module on professionalism, the student will work at an approved external site, typically a local or state health agency or a local organization under the supervision of a public health professional. If a student is able to do a placement only in his or her regular place of employment, the assignment must extend beyond or be something other than his or her regular work duties and allow application of knowledge and skills learned in the classroom.

Culminating Experience:

All MPH students must complete a Culminating Experience within their chosen program of study.

BIOS 6001: Culminating Experience in Biostatistics (2)

The Culminating Experience in Biostatistics allows the student to demonstrate the ability to integrate knowledge and skills in a Final Project similar to some aspect of practice as a public health professional. The faculty uses the Culminating Experience to judge whether the student demonstrates proficiency in the competencies required for public health practice.
Prerequisites: All CORE and BIOS Track Courses.

CHSC 6001: Culminating Experience in Community Health Sciences (2)

The Culminating Experience in Community Health Sciences allows the student to demonstrate the ability to integrate knowledge and skills in a Final Project similar to some aspect of practice as a public health professional. The faculty uses the Culminating Experience to judge whether the student demonstrates proficiency in the competencies required for public health practice.
Prerequisites: All CORE and CHSC Track Courses.

EOHS 6001: Culminating Experience in Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences (2)

The Culminating Experience in Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences allows the student to demonstrate the ability to integrate knowledge and skills in a Final Project similar to some aspect of practice as a public health professional. The faculty uses the Culminating Experience to judge whether the student demonstrates proficiency in the competencies required for public health practice.
Prerequisites: All CORE and EOHS Track Courses.

EPID 6001: Culminating Experience in Epidemiology (2)

The Culminating Experience in Epidemiology allows the student to demonstrate the ability to integrate knowledge and skills in a Final Project similar to some aspect of practice as a public health professional. The faculty uses the Culminating Experience to judge whether the student demonstrates proficiency in the competencies required for public health practice.
Prerequisites: All CORE and EPID Track Courses.

HPMG 6001: Culminating Experience in Health Policy and Management (2)

The Culminating Experience in Health Policy and Management allows the student to demonstrate the ability to integrate knowledge and skills in a Final Project similar to some aspect of practice as a public health professional. The faculty uses the Culminating Experience to judge whether the student demonstrates proficiency in the competencies required for public health practice.
Prerequisites: All CORE and EPID Track Courses.


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Some examples of projects completed by MPH students are:

A Free Nicotine Patch Distribution to Korean-American Smokers NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
A Logistics Manual for a Community Glaucoma Screening Program Dept. of Ophthalmology
A Qualitative Study of the Attitudes of Guyanese-American Men Towards Prostate Cancer Screening Shri Suryanarayan Mandir
A Qualitative Study of the Effectiveness of a Heart Health Educational Program for Chinese Americans in Manhattan's Chinatown Charles B. Wang Community Health Center
A Report to the Community on the Health Status of Young Women of Color in NYC Young Women of Color Coalition
Building Public Health Capacity at a Church Through a Parish Blood Drive Church of St. Savior
Creating a Health Resource Guide for Brooklyn Youth University Hospital of Brooklyn
Disaster Preparedness for the Pediatric Population: Planning an In-Hospital Triage System for New York City Hospitals Center for Biological Preparedness
Effect of a Brief Educational Intervention on Inner-city Patients with Hepatitis C Kings County Hospital Center, University Hospital of Brooklyn
Establishing a Mobile Needle-Exchange Program: Logistics and Client Education Positive Health Project
Health Education Seminars for Yemeni Immigrants Arab-American Family Support Center
Identifying Predictors of Serostatus Disclosure in an HIV-Treatment Population STAR Program
Nursing Factors Associated with Influenza Immunization of Inpatients University Hospital of Brooklyn
Pilot program for Integration of HIV Treatment at HIV Testing Sites in Addis Ababa. African Services Committee
Promotion of Hepatitis C Screening in the Polish Community of Greenpoint, Brooklyn NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
Raising Awareness of Heart Disease in Orthodox Jewish Women Bikur Cholim (Guardians of the Sick)/N'shei Women's Groups
Relationship Between Folic Acid Levels and Depressive Symptomatology in NHANES (National Health And Nutrition Examination Survey)
Screening and Education for Hypertension at a Senior Health Fair in Crown Heights Christopher Blenman Senior Center
Trends in Cancer Screening in Asian-Pacific Islander Women: An Analysis of NHIS (National Health Interview Survey) Data

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