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[November 24, 2015]

Dr. Michael A. Joseph Receives the Champion of Diversity Award in Public Health from Manhattan-Staten Island Area Health Education Center 

 

Michael A. Joseph, PhD, MPH, interim chairperson and assistant professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences in SUNY Downstate Medical Center’s School of Public Health, recently received the 2015 Dr. Muriel Petioni Champion of Diversity in Public Health Award from the Manhattan-Staten Island Area Health Education Center (MSI AHEC).

The awards are named for the late Muriel Petioni, MD, who was called the “mother of medicine in Harlem” by The Amsterdam News, and known for her vigorous commitment to women's issues, community medicine, social justice, and health care for the underserved, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

Also named as recipients of Champion of Diversity Awards were Rep. Charles B. Rangel (D-NY) (in Health Policy); Neil S. Calman, MD, FAAFP, president and CEO, the Institute for Family Health and chair of the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (in Medicine); and Barbara Ross-Lee, DO, FACOFP, vice president, health sciences and medical affairs, at New York Institute of Technology (in Health Professions Education).   
 
Dr. Joseph is also director of the Training/Education Core of the Brooklyn Health Disparities Center, a partnership between SUNY Downstate, the Arthur Ashe Institute for Urban Health, and the Office of the Brooklyn Borough President. In this role he provides underrepresented undergraduate and graduate students with education and training to pursue advanced study in the area of health disparities research. 

MSI AHEC is part of both a national program with centers in 46 states, and a New York State system designed to support nine centers throughout the state. MSI AHEC aims to increase the numbers of minorities within the health care delivery system, and prepare these professionals to serve those communities that need it the most.

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SUNY Downstate Medical Center, founded in 1860, was the first medical school in the United States to bring teaching out of the lecture hall and to the patient’s bedside. A center of innovation and excellence in research and clinical service delivery, SUNY Downstate Medical Center comprises a College of Medicine, Colleges of Nursing and Health Related Professions, a School of Graduate Studies, a School of Public Health, University Hospital of Brooklyn, and an Advanced Biotechnology Park and Biotechnology Incubator. 

SUNY Downstate ranks twelfth nationally in the number of alumni who are on the faculty of American medical schools. More physicians practicing in New York City have graduated from SUNY Downstate than from any other medical school. For more information, visit www.downstate.edu .
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