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Physical Therapy Program

Course Descriptions - Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT)

The BS/DPT curriculum in the physical therapy program at SUNY Downstate consists of 135.5 credits of physical therapy professional courses. This includes 43 credits at the undergraduate level, and 92.5 credits at the graduate level.

The following are descriptions of the Graduate Physical Therapy professional courses.

PTDP 6105 Motor Control and Motor Learning I

In this course students will discuss and compare theories of motor control of movement, and motor learning, issues related to performance and learning, and evaluate clinical and scientific evidence supporting the different theories. Students will also critically evaluate evidence for development and control of posture; mobility; and reach, grasp and manipulation activities. Influences of action and perception of the individual on motor control and motor learning and the effects of constraints of the individual, task and environment on motor outcomes will be appraised.

Lecture/discussion. Summer. 2.0 credits

PTDP 6106 Clinical Electrophysiology

This course is designed to provide students with the underlying theories, scientific bases, biological effects and clinical applications that support the use of electrotherapeutic modalities. The course includes a lecture component during which theoretical processes will be presented, and a supervised laboratory component for practice in the selection, rationale for use, effects, indications and contraindications for the application of the various electrotherapeutic modalities. Students will be given basic information on electrodiagnostic testing, however, the course will emphasize the examination, evaluation and indications for, and the application of, electrotherapy. Students will learn the use of therapeutic electricity for muscle strengthening, pain management, and enhancement of circulation and wound and bone healing.

Lecture/laboratory. Summer. 3.0 credits

PTDP 6108 Patient/Client Management III: Physical Agents

This course focuses on critically analyzing the thermal and mechanical agents that are used by physical therapists. The physical principles and physiological effects of heat, cold, water, light, traction, external compression and high-frequency electrical currents are presented. Clinical decision-making in the selection, application and evaluation of thermal and mechanical modalities is discussed and practiced within the context of a comprehensive plan of care to address impairments and functional limitations. The safe and effective practical applications of the modalities are part of comprehensive laboratory sessions. The principles of management of burn care are included. A Vendor Day Preceptorship and visit to New York Hospital's Burn Rehabilitation unit will be offered.

Lecture/laboratory/clinical experience. Summer 2.0 credits

PTDP 6206 Cardiovascular/Pulmonary Physical Therapy

This course covers screening, examination, differential diagnosis, and therapeutic interventions specific to the cardiac, vascular and pulmonary systems. An emphasis will be placed on impairments related to primary and secondary dysfunction of the cardiac and ventilatory pumps. Topics include cardiovascular and pulmonary rehabilitation, wellness, and preventative care for acute and chronic conditions across the lifespan. Issues of reliability, validity, sensitivity and predictability of screening and examination techniques will be addressed. Laboratory assignments emphasize examination and designing and implementing interventions for patients/clients with cardiovascular/pulmonary impairments.

Lecture/laboratory/discussion. Summer. 5.0 credits

PTDP 6305 Preventative Care and Health and Wellness

This course is directed towards prevention of primary and secondary impairments, functional limitations, and disabilities, through health promotion, fitness and wellness behaviors. The course will entail the critical analysis and design of programs in body mechanics, ergonomics, work hardening, and industrial physical therapy. The format of teaching will include lecture and small group discussion.

Lecture/discussion. Summer 1.0 credit

PTDP 6100 Research Study I: Proposal Development

This course provides a forum for students to develop elements of a research proposal that will form the basis for the research that is conducted for their final research project. Students will identify a conceptual framework and provide an extensive review of relevant literature to support the structural framework. This course is the first course in the Research series that leads toward completion of a research study under the guidance of a faculty mentor. Students submit the written paper at the end of the semester.

Seminar/Group Study. Fall. 1.0 credit

PTDP 6204 Musculoskeletal Physical Therapy II

This course is a continuation of Musculoskeletal Physical Therapy I. In this lecture/laboratory course, students will critically review the theory and practice of musculoskeletal physical therapy with emphasis on methods of examination, evaluation, and manual therapy interventions for the spine as well as analyze the physical therapy management of patients with complex musculoskeletal problems. They will also examine the clinical decision-making involved in differential diagnosis of musculoskeletal problems. Therapeutic exercise will also be integrated throughout the course. The course will be organized around a problem-based and case-based approach, along with learning of advanced manual therapy psychomotor skills in the laboratory. Through critical analysis of outcome-based literature related to musculoskeletal examination and intervention, students will also learn how to engage in evidence-based practice when dealing with patients/clients with musculoskeletal problems. Students will learn how to manage patients with partial and total joint arthroplasties.

Lecture/discussion/laboratory. Fall. 5.0 credits

PTDP 6205 Motor Control and Motor Learning II

This course is a continuation of Motor Control and Motor Learning I in which students compare and contrast different therapeutic models related to atypical human movement. Students design, implement and modify therapeutic plans based upon examination, evaluation and diagnosis of impairments and functional limitations. Evidence for the various therapeutic exercise models will be evaluated. The learning format of this class is lecture, laboratory, clinical observation, role- playing, case-based learning, and discussion.

Lecture/discussion. Fall. 4.0 credits

PTDP 6308 Integumentary Physical Therapy: Prosthetics and Orthotics

This course covers the pathomechanics, biomechanics, and prescription of prosthetic and orthotic devices. Examination, evaluation and intervention for individuals with amputations and those in need of orthotic devices are discussed. The use of sterile technique and the principles of wound care are included. The course will be in the form of lecture, discussion, laboratory and demonstration sessions in order to prepare the student for working with individuals with limb amputations and prescription orthotics in the clinical setting.

Lecture/laboratory/discussion. Fall. 4.0 credits

 

PTDP 6101 Clinical Internship I

This is the first course in the clinical education sequence. The Academic Coordinator of Clinical Education (ACCE) and faculty to augment the individual learning needs and goals of the student plan the clinical education experience. Students are placed in one clinical site for a six-week clinical educational experience.

Clinical experience. Spring. 6.0 credits

PTDP 6102 Grand Rounds I

This is the first course in the grand rounds sequence. This seminar will focus on exploring the expectations of physical therapy students in a clinical setting. Issues related to the therapist-patient relationship and student-clinical instructor (CI) relationship will be examined. Issues regarding professional behavior, dealing with clinical problems, and the grading scheme used by the CI will be discussed. Students will learn how to effectively approach the clinical educational experience through discussion, role-play, and selected readings. Following the Clinical Internship I course, students will continue with Grand Rounds I to discuss and provide feedback regarding their clinical educational experience. They will also present a 20-minute case report concerning one relevant case for physical therapy based on Clinical Internship I. Physical therapy faculty is invited to attend and participate in Grand Rounds I. Furthermore, Grand Rounds I will be open to members of the Downstate community and the program's clinical sites.

Seminar. Spring. 1.0 credit

 

PTDP 6200 Research Study II: The IRB

This is a continuation of Research Study I: Proposal Development. It is a preparatory course for the data collection phase of the students' final research study. While working closely with a faculty research mentor, students examine ethics in research and complete an Investigator Education Program offered by Downstate's Institutional Review Board (IRB). The Investigator Education Program consists of examining Downstate's Multiple Project Assurance (MPA) of Compliance with DHHS Regulations for the Protection of Human Subjects, the Belmont Report, and the IRB's Principal Investigator's Procedures Manual for the Use of Human Subjects in Research. They will also complete the on-line Collaborative IRB Training Initiative training program complete a mock IRB application and informed consent form for their proposed study.

Seminar/Group study. Spring. 1.0 credit

PTDP 6208 Neuromuscular Physical Therapy

This course is a continuation of Motor Control and Motor Learning I and II in which students integrate screening, examination, evaluation, physical therapy diagnosis, prognosis, plan of care, intervention, reassessment and discharge planning into the total care of patients/clients. In this course, students apply the Nagi Model of Disablement and the patient/client management model to the physical therapy management of patients/clients with neuromuscular disorders through discussion, role modeling and case-based learning. Students are guided through problem solving activities to design, supervise and implement physical therapy intervention based upon the needs of the individual with complex neurological and multi-system impairments. Students integrate the needs of the patient, family, caregivers and society into the practice of physical therapy.

Lecture/laboratory/discussion. Spring. 4.0 credits

PTDP 6303 Clinical Decision-Making

This course introduces the student to clinical decision-making processes in physical therapy practice. The patient/client management model is introduced. The disablement model and medical model are compared and contrasted. The student is introduced to the patient/client management model. The ideas introduced in this course will be threaded through all clinically based courses in the curriculum.

Lecture/discussion. Spring. 1.0 credit

PTDP 6306 Pediatric Physical Therapy

This course focuses on the physical therapy management of neuromuscular, musculoskeletal and pulmonary impairments and selected medical diagnoses in pediatric patients/clients. Pediatric Physical Therapy places emphasis on developmental disabilities. It is a culminating course in neuromuscular physical therapy, that is a specific application and synthesis of earlier knowledge specifically related to the pediatric population. It is a continuation of Neuromuscular Physical Therapy. The major theories of physical therapy patient/client management for children with developmental and acquired disabilities are discussed. Classroom instruction includes interactive lecture, discussion, and laboratory sessions with emphasis on problem-based learning, handling and facilitation techniques, and therapeutic exercise. Pediatric clinical preceptorship experiences are also included.

Lecture/discussion/laboratory/clinical experience. Spring. 3.0 credits

PTDP 6307 Radiology

This course covers the interpretation of radiological diagnostic tests with an emphasis on the integration of radiological test results into the clinical decision-making process. The principles of radiodensity with respect to human tissue, contrast methods, effect of projection angle, correct viewing methods, fracture assessment and perception of the third dimension will be addressed, which will provide the basis for radiographic assessment of the axial and appendicular skeleton. This course also covers MRI, CT, and contrast imaging of the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular/pulmonary systems, with an emphasis on weighing radiological test results when formulating differential diagnoses for patients/clients across the lifespan. In addition, the role of functional MRI and PET scans in research will be discussed.

Lecture/discussion. Spring. 1.0 credit

PTDP 6309 Administration and Supervision in Physical Therapy

This course will cover topics such as the study of design, equipment, supervision and personnel management, employment practices, marketing and record keeping for a physical therapy practice setting. Issues related to professional ethics, state and federal laws, government and non-government regulating bodies, documentation, and reimbursement will also be discussed and evaluated.

Lecture/discussion. Spring. 1.0 credit

 

PTDP 6201 Clinical Internship II

This course is a continuation of the clinical education sequence (II of I-IV). This is a 10-week, full-time clinical educational experience that is scheduled for the spring semester of the second year. This course will cultivate the development of advanced skills in patient/client management. Students will be assigned to clinical settings that are appropriate for their knowledge base at that juncture of the program. Clinical sites include, but are not limited to, adult rehabilitation, acute care, orthopedic out patient, and cardiovascular/pulmonary settings.

Clinical experience. Summer. 10.0 credits

PTDP 6202 Grand Rounds II

This is the second course in the grand rounds sequence. The ACCE will coordinate a general Grand Rounds, in which each student will be required to present a 20-minute case report concerning one relevant case for physical therapy based on Clinical Internship II. Physical therapy faculty is invited to attend and participate in Grand Rounds. Furthermore, Grand Rounds will be open to members of the Downstate community and the program's clinical sites. This seminar will focus on exploring the expectations of physical therapy students in a clinical setting. Issues related to the therapist-patient relationship and student-clinical instructor relationship will be discussed. Issues regarding professional behavior, dealing with clinical problems, and the grading scheme used by the CI will be emphasized.

Seminar. Summer. 1.0 credit

PTDP 6300 Research Study III: Data Collection

This is a continuation of Research Study II: The IRB. Under the guidance of a faculty mentor, students implement the research proposal completed in Research Study I: Proposal Development by beginning the process of collecting quantitative and/or qualitative information. This data collection process will lead toward completion of their final research study.

Group study. Summer. 0.5 credits

PTDP 6301 Clinical Internship III

This course is a continuation of the clinical education sequence (III of I-IV). This is a 10-week, full-time clinical educational experience that is scheduled for the fall semester of the third year. This course will cultivate the development of entry-level skills in patient/client management and continue the integration of academic knowledge with clinical decision-making and critical thinking skills as students continue to develop to become doctoral-prepared practitioners. Students will be assigned to clinical settings appropriate with their knowledge base at that juncture of the program. Clinical sites may include specialty areas such as pediatrics, geriatrics, burn rehabilitation, performing arts physical therapy and home care settings.

Clinical experience. Fall. 10.0 credits

PTDP 6302 Grand Rounds III

This is the third course in the grand rounds sequence. The ACCE will coordinate a general Grand Rounds, in which each student will be required to present a 20-minute case report concerning one relevant case for physical therapy based on Clinical Internship III. Physical therapy faculty is invited to attend and participate in Grand Rounds III. Furthermore, Grand Rounds III will be open to members of the Downstate community and the program's clinical sites. This seminar will focus on exploring the expectations of physical therapy students in a clinical setting. Issues related to the therapist-patient relationship and student-clinical instructor relationship will be discussed. Issues regarding professional behavior, dealing with clinical problems, and the grading scheme used by the CI will be emphasized.

Seminar. Fall. 1.0 credit

PTDP 6304 Professional Development II

In this course students will examine both accepted principles of medical ethics and ethics in the profession of physical therapy. Legal and established professional standards will be identified. Students will address issues related to the forces that shape ethical development such as social, cultural and historical influences. Students will learn to analyze ethical dilemmas and develop ethical reasoning in pursuit of appropriate action. The learning format of this class is lecture and discussion based on assigned readings and case studies.

Lecture/discussion. Fall. 1.0 credit

PTDP 6400 Research Study IV: Findings and Analysis

This is a continuation of Research Study III: Data Collection. The students will work with their faculty research mentor to complete the process of collecting quantitative and/or qualitative information that commenced in Research Study III: Data Collection. This phase of the research course work will focus on data analysis and writing of preliminary results. Students will also learn how to construct a research poster for presentation.

Group study. Fall. 0.5 credits

PTDP 6404 Pharmacology

This course is designed to provide the student with the fundamental knowledge of different drug classifications and the pharmacodynamics of the most frequently used drugs. Learning methods include lecture, audiovisual materials, journal articles, and simulations.

Lecture/discussion. Fall. 2.0 credits

PTDP 6401 Clinical Internship IV

This course is the most advanced course of the clinical education sequence (III of I-IV). This is a 14-week, full-time clinical educational experience that is scheduled for the spring semester of the third year. The student, before entering this course, has satisfactorily completed all course work in the program. The ultimate goal is for the student to become a competent, doctoral-prepared physical therapist with entry-level skills in patient/client management and integration academic knowledge with clinical decision-making and critical thinking skills. Students will be assigned to all clinical settings that are available to the program, and will be expected to exhibit the skills and abilities of an entry-level practitioner by the end of this course. Clinical sites may include specialty areas such as pediatrics, geriatrics, burn rehabilitation, performing arts physical therapy and home care settings.

Clinical experience. Spring. 14.0 credits

PTDP 6402 Grand Rounds IV

This is the fourth and final course in the Grand Rounds sequence. The ACCE will coordinate a general Grand Rounds, in which each student will be required to present a 20-minute case report concerning one relevant case for physical therapy based on Clinical Internship IV. Physical therapy faculty is invited to attend and participate in Grand Rounds IV. Furthermore, Grand Rounds IV will be open to members of the Downstate community and the program=s clinical sites. This seminar will focus on exploring the expectations of physical therapy students in a clinical setting. Issues related to the therapist-patient relationship and student-clinical instructor relationship will be discussed. Issues regarding professional behavior, dealing with clinical problems, and the grading scheme used by the clinical instructor will be emphasized.

Seminar. Spring. 1.0 credit

PTDP 6405 Differential Diagnosis

In this course, students will learn to formulate a diagnosis based upon the screening, examination and evaluation of impairments and functional limitations of the patient/client. Students, faculty and volunteers will use role-play and discussion to further integrate the screening, examination and evaluation of patients/clients with complex multi-system conditions. Through evidence-based clinical decision making, students will discuss the process of making a differential diagnosis. A case-based format will be used to integrate clinical findings in order to arrive at a diagnosis and to determine whether to initiate intervention or refer to another practitioner. Students will critically appraise the different physical therapy diagnoses made by classmates and those of expert practitioners. The scope of the physical therapy practice, formulating diagnoses and referring to physicians and other health care practitioners will be discussed.

Lecture/discussion. Spring. 2.0 credits

PTDP 6500 Research Study V: Final Thesis

This course is a continuation of Research Study IV: Findings and Analysis. It is the final course in the Research Study series that leads toward completion of a group research project under the guidance of a faculty research mentor. Students will complete their research study and present their research project at a scientific forum to be arranged by the Physical Therapy Department. Students will submit a bounded manuscript detailing the project and make a standard poster for the presentation of the project. Students will work closely with their faculty research mentor to complete the activities required for this course.

Group study. Spring. 1.0 credit